Municipal Election 2018: Candidates’ complete responses


2018 is a big year for Ottawa. In October, we will elect a new city council. That means we have the opportunity to elect a city council and Mayor who prioritize a green, healthy and liveable Ottawa for the next four years.

This municipal election, Ecology Ottawa will continue to raise awareness of local environmental priorities among both voters and candidates, inform Ottawa residents of their candidates’ environmental stands, promote environmental leadership and get out the vote for a greener council.

As part of our Municipal Election campaign, Ecology Ottawa is polling all candidates running for City Council and Mayor for their stand on key environmental issues in Ottawa, including local action on climate change (Renewable City), sustainable transportation (Active City), trees, greenspaces and river (Living City), and waste management. Candidates are presented with fifteen yes/no questions and one open-ended question, and an opportunity to comment on all their responses.

Here you can fine the candidates’ complete responses to our survey. A summary of these responses are available here. A star (*) indicates the incumbent in each Ward. If you’re not sure which Ward you belong to, use the following map.

Mayor

Ward 1 – Orléans  Ward 2 – Innes  Ward 3 – Barrhaven  Ward 4 – Kanata North  Ward 5 – West Carleton-March  Ward 6 – Stittsville  Ward 7 – Bay  Ward 8 – College

Ward 9 – Knoxdale-Merivale  Ward 10 – Gloucester-Southgate  Ward 11 – Beacon Hill-Cyrville  Ward 12 – Rideau-Vanier  Ward 13 – Rideau-Rockcliffe  Ward 14 – Somerset  Ward 15 – Kitchissippi  Ward 16 – River

Ward 17 – Capital  Ward 18 – Alta Vista  Ward 19 – Cumberland  Ward 20 – Osgoode  Ward 21 – Rideau-Goulbourn  Ward 22 – Gloucester-South Nepean  Ward 23 – Kanata South

Mayor

Note: Mr. Jim Watson sent in his answer by August 10, but didn’t directly address any of our yes/no questions. His response is listed in question 16.

Renewable City

1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. As Ottawa’s Mayor I will make it my priority to create a robust administrative system to assist the City’s renewable energy, energy efficiency, pollution reduction, clean transportation, sustainable water management, safe mobility including cycling and walking, sustainable management and projects that protect property, land, air, water.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. When assessing the entire needs of our residents.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. Climate change is an urban problem and a political problem. My book Urban Meltdown: Cities, Climate Change and Politics as Usual lays out my positions on climate change and politics. As of its publication, 70 per cent of green house gases are generated by cities and 80 per cent of Canadians live in cities.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I’m naturally keen on augmenting the city’s enviro health sustainability. A prime concern are the numerous federally owned properties throughout the Ottawa region that have been awaiting decontamination for decades.

Moises Schachtler: YES

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

2. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. more focus on reviewing and monitoring good progress on Green Debentures under the City Green debenture framework and make sure the environmental strategy of the City of Ottawa including environmental commitment and its action plan meet the demands of the climate goals we promised to Canadians and to the international glob as well.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. Could be more than once a year or less depending on a number of factors

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. As a city councillor, I hosted the Clean Air Summit and federal/municipal clean air measurements. I will continue this work as mayor.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.It wouldn’t surprise me if yearly reports are possible at equal to the cost of those that are produced every four years.

Moises Schachtler: YES.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

3. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council? 

Hamid Alakozai: YES. The residents of Ottawa deserve to have access to clean air, water and soils. As the Mayor of the City of Ottawa, I and my team of City Councillors are responsible to organize a new action plan to serve the residents of Ottawa. Remember we made promises to the people of this City when we got the endorsement signatures and we are obligated to keep those promises.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. It will be put before the Council to discuss it.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. It’s necessary to have in one place an overview of the problems and possible solutions for the city. Right now, we work in data silos.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I am promoting myself as a 21st century visionary realist Mayor, and leader of bold innovative forward-thinking solutions.

Moises Schachtler: YES.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

4. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. The residents of Ottawa deserve to have access to clean air, water and soils. As the Mayor of the City of Ottawa, I and my team of City Councillors are responsible to organize a new action plan to serve the residents of Ottawa. Remember we made promises to the people of this City when we got the endorsement signatures and we are obligated to keep those promises.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. Official Plans aren’t worth the paper they are written on if they are not adhered to, which is usually the case under this City Hall. Ottawa’s current Official Plan is a collection of statements about intentions, not how the city actually grows.

Joey Drouin: YES

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I am on record with the Platform that I released last September, of advocating for a smart green blend distinct “Complete Street” vibrant people-friendly eclectic communities

Moises Schachtler: YES. Environmentally loving development is not just great for our community, it is also an amazing example to the world. Low-emission development is my top priority. It makes it easier to love our city and it makes it look sexy and modern at the same time.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

Active City

5. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand city-wide?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. I strongly believe in providning clean transportation, , safe mobility including cycling and walking. Action plan based on sustainable management and projects that protect property, land, air, water. As I think we all know, Ottawa City is a good city. When we talk about change, we are talking about building on a good foundation created by mayors, city Councillors and citizen activists who preceded us. We all also know that when we talk about change in life in a city we are talking about money. As Mayor of Canada’s Capital city, I will work to learn about all sources of provincial and federal programs for economic and development aid city governments and lobby for that aid for Ottawa City with as much energy and skill as I can muster.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. Transit and road policies will be forthcoming.

Joey Drouin: YES

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I naturally know Ottawa’s Constituents desire a smart Green blend of Distinct ‘Complete Street’ Vibrant People-Friendly Eclectic Communities, Uber “NeoRetroClassic” Architecture + Creative Cycling/Auto Parking and Roadway Solutions. In 2010 I advocated to the Mayor, and city Council that we DIDN’T NEED a northerly LRT link from downtown to the west end, because the public transit service was already outstanding, along the Ottawa River Parkway (and still is)…and that Ottawa was in somewhat dire need of either a southerly transitway, cycling, and pedestrian lane, from the Internatinal Airport to the Arena in Kanata. In 2014, I advocated that a Safe Cycling Lane be created along the centre median of Carling Avenue, and I’d like to see something similar created for Baseline Road.

Moises Schachtler: YES. This is something I will push orders of magnitude further than our previous leadership. I will eliminate street parking on many roads instead opting to create more single, safe, and secure lanes for pedestrians. Ottawa will be among the most pedestrian friendly cities in the world.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

6. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. I will organize Town Hall meetings throughout the City for people who wish to discuss the City LRT program and most importantly its solid technical operation around the City, if the LRT system get down? what will be B plan? to solve LRT’s technical problem quickly as possible for the residents because transportation is very important issue and based on consultations with the local communities member bring the best solution for the people to be served and these meetings and my walks and talks with city residents, Council Members and I can develop a cost-effective action plan with both long and short term goals to be able that the LRT projects are provided based on professional way that is suited to cost management and also meet the demands of the local population.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. There are some factors to be considered before making a final promise..

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet:The old streetcar system was based on a ten minute pedestrian shed. The walk from residences to streetcar stop was never more than ten minutes. We need the same objective.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.

Moises Schachtler: NO. I will look to find the optimal level of connectivity necessary to ensure resources are not misused. As I answered previously, the entire city’s mobility services will be transformed to prioritize pedestrian connectivity, safety and security.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

7. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built city-wide?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. As the Mayor for the City of Ottawa I plan to bring positive changes to serve our people better and make the City of Ottawa even more beautiful.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. When possible.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I naturally know Ottawa’s Constituents desire a smart Green blend of Distinct ‘Complete Street’ Vibrant People-Friendly Eclectic Communities, Uber “NeoRetroClassic” Architecture + Creative Cycling/Auto Parking and Roadway Solutions…and I passionately favour it!

Moises Schachtler: YES. I will do everything in my power to reduce congestion and pollution in our city.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

8. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Hamid Alakozai: NO. The design of the roads are not bad but we have to focus more on to reduce the speeding and public awareness about reducing speeds and separating the road users these are important and major things to be condisers to bring positive changes in the future for the better management without problems.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. The safety of our residents is my top priority.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.

Moises Schachtler: YES. Absolutely.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

Living City

9. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. I will serve the people of Ottawa with a municipal government based on trust, transparency, accountability and efficiency. I promise to make changes based on sensitivities to Ottawa’s residents needs.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. It will be discussed in Council.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. We depend on full canopy trees for climate cooling, shade and beauty. Clean water and a strong forest canopy are two of the city basics and should always be a priority.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.

Moises Schachtler: YES. I will personally go out and plant the trees my self.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

10. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. Large projects such as increasing forest coverage, managing stormwater, and assessing water quality among the other projects, and monitoring good progress on Green Debentures under the City Green debenture framework. Focus on the environmental strategy of the City of Ottawa including environmental commitment and its action plan.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. Wherever possible.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. I brought in pedestrian friendly sidewalk standards as a city councillor, which are honoured more in the breaching than the action. As Mayor we will start with ending roll up/roll down sidewalks as the policy intended.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.

Moises Schachtler: YES.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

11. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. The residents of Ottawa deserve to have access to clean air, water and soils. As the Mayor of the City of Ottawa, I and my team of City Councillors are responsible to organize a new action plan to serve the residents of Ottawa.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. Easy to say click yes, but hard to do, as developers always want treed properties because they are considered prestige areas. This yes will require a very different relationship with developers.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I feel our various city regions need more visionary eclectic blends of greenspace fauna biodiversity…such as Mud Lake, Britannia Conservation Area, many niche areas along the Ottawa and River, and throughout the city.

Moises Schachtler: YES. I won’t let you down.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

12. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. The residents of Ottawa deserve to have access to clean air, water and soils. As the Mayor of the City of Ottawa, I and my team of City Councillors are responsible to organize a new action plan to serve the residents of Ottawa. Remember we made promises to the people of this City when we got the endorsement signatures and we are obligated to keep those promises.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. Who in their right mind would say no?

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: NO. I would need further information on this project in order to oppose it. I clicked no, simply because the prior Ontario government who was very pro-environment was in favour of it (I didn’t much like the OLP by the way), and the Quebec municipalities are against it for perhaps regional economic reasons.

Moises Schachtler: YES. My mind can be changed if the waste management is beyond impressive.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

Waste Management

13. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. Using plastic is not a healthy issue we must avoid using plastic as much we can. The City government is responsible for reliable garbage collection at least twice a week. The green or blue bins, plastic bags, and industrial containers must be recycled on time or dumped into local landfills.

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. I need more informations and statistics in order to decide, I have to click yes because your program needs only yes or no.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien:

Moises Schachtler: YES. It’s called a green bin, not a plastic bin.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

14. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. We need a long term solid waste management strategy designed to extend the life of all landfill facilities and make the blue and black bin recycling programs more efficient..

Ahmed Bouragba:.NO. A large increase in this case is not justified when people are starving in Ottawa, I am looking to reduce taxes and focus on safety and justice for people and for our valuable nature.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES. I would want to think carefully about how we spent that increased budget. It may not be simply for promotion.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES. I’m also a proponent of smart creative marketing to effectively get messages across.

Moises Schachtler: NO. That money can instead be used replace the garbage bins around the city with larger bins that include recyclable disposables. That in itself is promotion for waste prevention. If truly proven necessary, I will support increasing this type of funding. Maybe the cans and bottles that are recycled with the new bins to the city can be used to pay for this promotion and education.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

15. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Hamid Alakozai: YES. The green or blue bins, plastic bags, and industrial containers must be recycled on time or dumped into local landfills. We need a long term solid waste management strategy designed to extend the life of all landfill facilities and make the blue and black bin recycling programs more efficient..

Ahmed Bouragba: YES. If effective and possible

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: YES.

Joey Drouin: YES.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: YES.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: YES.

Moises Schachtler: YES. I will support the development of new waste management strategies. I will promote responsible consumption since that is the source of the waste.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*:

16. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Hamid Alakozai: I’m promising to the people of Ottawa, when I become Mayor of the City of Ottawa, I will spend 20% of my time in my office and 80% of my time with the residents of Ottawa.  By spending time and talking with the City’s residents, I will be better able to solve their problems and make the City cleaner and more beautiful.

Ahmed Bouragba: To jump from the bottom of the list and be a leader is quiet challenging. My first step is to focus on the education of the environmental issues, then to plan, budget and implement an effective program.

Bernard Couchman:

Clive Doucet: We will begin the term with an environmental/smart city summit where we will compose the environmental/sustainable city priorities for the next four years.

Joey Drouin: My electoral platform is dedicated to a One City Vision. That is, I am advocating for a new governance model that would see Ottawa and Gatineau unite as one capital city. In my view, this new model would deliver benefits to the citizens of the National Capital Region in numerous areas, such as a seamless and integrated inter-provincial transportation system, as well as uniform environmental standards and the more efficient management of our river resources. Under a unified capital, we can prioritize smarter and more eco-friendly growth.

Ryan Lythall:

Craig MacAulay: I would look for best practices in other cities (what’s going on in Montreal is particularly inspiring). As mayor I wouldn’t exert any personal power myself or take a salary. I would let the collective wisdom of citizen groups like Ecology Ottawa lead the way.

Bruce McConville:

Michael Pastien: I’m a fiscal-smart bold solar visionary realist, wishing to refreshingly, greenly, and organically beautify Ottawa!

Moises Schachtler: Step 1. Look into creating revenue from our disposed waste.

Step 2. Invite and welcome companies like First Solar to grow our renewable energy projects.

Step 3. Help our public transportation transition into electric vehicles.

Step 4. Constantly look at how to match and surpass the cities that are the leaders on environmental issues.

Step 5. Build a solid foundation for growth for our future leaders in this respect.

Finally, an environmentally loving city is not just fantastic for life, it is also incredibly appealing, beautiful, and sexy.

James T. Sheahan:

Jim Watson*: please see Mr. Watson’s response here.

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Ward 1 – Orléans

Renewable City

1.Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Rick Bédard: YES. It may be appropriate to re-direct existing staff to this important initiative.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. I believe climate change is a real and pressing issue that needs to be addressed at the municipal level. A climate lens is a great start.

Guy Desroches: YES. Recently OC Transpo put up their hybrid buses for sale, looks that they already given up. I will be the voice at Council and at the city to make sure all vehicles from all departments contain renewable energy.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. My focus will be on planning and prioritization.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES.

Miranda Gray: YES. Yes, an environmental lens is one of the many ways we must look at our city and our future. It won’t be the only factor but it must be one of the factors all councillors consider for every decision they make.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES. I will work hard to ensure that we, as a city, do our part to reduce our impact on the climate. A climate lens would go a long way to ensuring we always consider our impact on the environment.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Strong supporter of biking infrastructure spending, and LRT and Public transit initative

2. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Rick Bédard: YES. It should be a priority of staff to communicate with council on important issues at least once a year.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. We need to commit our significance and assurance to climate change.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: NO. While four years may be too long, the process should never be the deliverable. Efforts and resources should be directed at the goals.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. Need to confer with the Environment and Climate Protection Committee. If it’s already part of their mandate great, if not it’s something to discuss.

Miranda Gray: YES. Once a year is not going to be enough. We need to be able to track trends. So we should start at once in 2019, twice in 2020, quarterly in 2021 and monthly by 2022. We’ll need to make smart investments in data collection and release so this mostly automated so it is not a giant time committment on our limited staff.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES.

3. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Rick Bédard: It’s important for the City of Ottawa to consider new development standards such as less asphalt and more permeable surfaces.

Toby Bossert:

Mireille Brownhill: YES. With the support of fellow councillors, of course.

Guy Desroches: YES. The Climate Adaptation Plan needs to come with timelines in order to ever be respected.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES.

Miranda Gray: YES. The development of our new City Plan must consider climate adaption. From which trees we should plant for shade 30 years from now to orientation of new buildings to provide both light and shade, our changing climate impacts how livable our city remains.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. While I admit I do not the details of the Climate Adaption Plan , in concept, it seems to be a reasonable plan to strive for. I would toreceive more information.

4. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Rick Bédard: YES. I am a strong supporter of denser development that is also mixed use. It is crucial that we have neighborhoods that are built for people instead of cars.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. One of my priorities is safe streets and parks, which would help to make our community healthier as well as reduce environmental impact of travel.

Guy Desroches: YES. With the arrival of LRT phase 1 and 2, this will commit to a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by taking buses of the road and confidently the next generation of buses the city purchases will be more efficient.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. I initiated the Balance Orleans information campaign to reduce travel for federal employees. Sending 4000 DND employees from Orleans to work in Kanata make no logical sense.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. Ottawa absolutely needs to continue working on such issues.

Miranda Gray: YES. The key design elements of a 10 minute neighbour provide lots of room for the development of a great city. It is a good framework to build on our most successful neighbourhoods while helping to describe our vision for new and re-developing areas of the city.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. I fully support this. I have also indicated that Zoning and Developmentplanning needs to have more strength and appeals to the plan by Developers should be the exception rather than the norm

Active City

5. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Rick Bédard: YES. As in the previous answer, we need communities that have jobs, startups, stores, workshops, services, offices, schools, parks, all within walking distance.

Toby Bossert: YES. I would prioritize public transit being more accessible and more affordable.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. This is one of my priorites. Though there is less alternative travel in the suburbs, often the reason is the lack of infrastructure. I will work to improve that!

Guy Desroches: YES. In Orléans we will see the widening of the 174 and confidently the arrival of a high-occupancy vehicle lane, along with the LRT.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: NO.

Doug Feltmate: YES. I answered yes but the evidence should also consider the lack of employment lands in many parts of the city. This has to be a focus of all three levels of government.

Jarrod Goldsmith: NO. While many people in suburban areas like Ward 1 use vehicles to get around (work, shop, play), there needs to be a review of public transit accessibility. Safer roads for vehicle traffic, pedestrians and cycling is needed.

Miranda Gray: YES. I need to answer this from a city wide view. But there is tension about how this plays out for a bedroom community like Orleans where most of us must leave the ward to work. Making Orleans a place where people can live, play and work is a long term goal. In the meantime, my priority will remain local refinements to the public transit and cycling network for those moving towards the new transit hubs coming to Orleans in Light Rail Phase 2. For the kids, we need to maintain a safe pedestrian network so fewer kids must be driven to school.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: NO. At this point in time they would all be priorities.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES. I want to make public spaces accessible to cycle and pedestrian traffic. I would like to see protected bike lanes on St. Joseph Blvd and work to improve safety for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Yes,if you have reviewed my priorities and issues, you will see that I have promoted that all future roadway infrastructure planning must consider improved biking and pedestrian access

6. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Rick Bédard: YES. This will require not only close cooperation between bus and rail service, but also finding new ways to make this integration work better such as a possible reliance on the sharing economy.

Toby Bossert: YES. One of the pillars of my campaign platform is increasing transit accessibility in Orleans. I want the bus to be a viable alternative to driving rather than a last resort.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. We will need to ensure that all residents, particularly the connectivity plan at and under the 5 kilometers mark, choose public transit.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: NO.

Doug Feltmate: NO. I will not commit to five kilometers without first studying the connectivity plan.

Jarrod Goldsmith: NO. From my understanding, many residents in Orléans tend to use vehicles to get to work, go downtown, or even to a transit hub. Densifying ares around LRT is crucial, including prioritizing transit connectivity.

Miranda Gray: YES. I have already been advocating at the Transit and Transportation committee meetings for a faster review of the transportation master plan. I am worried that ridership will drop with LRT rollout if we don’t have excellent connections from the Blair station in the next 4 years and the eastern stations later. Connectivity means walking and cycling connections to the hubs when the hubs open not years later. It means local route changes to service the new patterns of ridership. Here in Orleans we most of us are very lucky that we will be relatively close to future transit hubs. But the hill to the upper part of the ward is a significant barrier to walkers and pedestrians so we need consider the connectivity needs of those parts of the ward.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff:  YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Again , in my priorities and issues, I mention that connections to LRT , including feeder local buses , etc must be carefully planned and executed

7. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Rick Bédard: YES. I am a believer in what the Dutch call “Woonerf” streets where pedestrians and cyclists are given priority and cars are treated as guests.

Toby Bossert: YES. Wherever it is practical and safe to do so I am open to creating bike lanes or bike paths. On busy streets where the only option is to remove lanes of traffic I am however i believe that would be a mistake.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. Absolutely!

Guy Desroches: YES. As a wheelchair user myself making all new roads be more accessible to all, will be a priority for me.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: NO. It is not a priority on all streets built in the Ward. Consideration should be given to arterial roads as the current focus to ensure public use safety. I think the the lack of safety for bikes on arterials keeps many people from using that mode and that has to change.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. Increased consideration and awareness for improving cycling and pedestrian infrastructure is wise.

Miranda Gray: YES. As a community built after 1970, we are lucky to have wide boulevards for many of our major streets. As they are redeveloped, complete streets needs to become the core way we redesign them.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff:  YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Iam constantly frustratedthen I see existing roads paved and sidewalks replaced without improving the access to biking lanes or improvements to pedestrian safety.

8. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Rick Bédard: YES. See above answer.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. I plan to support road design that is safe for all users.

Guy Desroches: YES. The city is slowly improving this policy and his slow to change. After being on the accessibility advisory committee, I saw some slow progress and we did see some modification, changes need to happen.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. This is a conditional yes. The City must provide a framework as it applies to what it has control over. However a proper Vision Zero approach needs Federal and Provincial involvement and legislation. The funding should flow down from Feds and the Province as legislative and enforcement bodies have to be in play…….not just bylaws.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES.

Miranda Gray: YES. Gosh, I thought Ottawa had already adopted it. Certainly, planning consultations, transportation and transit meetings, I have been among other presentors asking the city to make more funds available and to prioritize this work. Vision Zero needs to become one of the bedrock lens we use to evaluate our work as councillors.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Fully agree

Living City

9. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Rick Bédard: YES. I support a treescape plan not only to make our city more beautiful but to go one step further — why not add edible fruit trees to the mix and feed the city too.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. As a resident I did see ash trees being cut down due to disease. The city did implement a replacement program with a watering plan. My commitment will ensure the City observe the policy and make sure the developers are instructed to do so.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES.

Miranda Gray: YES. Recently I learned that the number of trees on a street can be used to predict the health of the people who live there. I want a healthy city for people and that means having a diverse, managed urban forest.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. I agree with the concept and have called for the expansion of Community parks and sites which incorporate greenery. The definition of “Full funding” needs to be reviewed. I actually think that Urban development companies should contribute as a part of development fees.

10. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Rick Bédard: YES. See earlier answers

Toby Bossert: YES. Wherever possible, practical and affordable.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. The city needs to guarantee rainwater is well managed before it is sent in the rivers and I will make this a priority to ensure our beach in Orléans does not need to close in the summer. The run of rivers needs to be opened early in the spring to make certain the surge is kept moving.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. Yes…but I think it goes farther. We are building communities with too many ‘hard surfaces’ that make it difficult to soak up and filter rain water. Community planning and intensification will be the solution. In a live, work, play, the play and park component will integral green spaces and not just relying on community parks.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. More trees along roadways makes for a better quality of life for everyone.

Miranda Gray: YES. I don’t think street surfacing and new road builds are the core issue. We have lots of other work on our infrastructure that is cheaper and easier to implement. Roads are important but they are just part of the built strucuture of a modern city.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Whereever possible

11. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Rick Bédard: YES. In addition to preserving and enhancing our green spaces, I believe it’s important to make them more accessible to our community.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. This is why a councilor needs to see city issues; even if is ward is a well-developed area. Every square feet of green space needs a voice and I will be that influence.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. I think that mindset is already in place and just needs to be reinforced.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. Upgrading and protecting parks and other greenspace is beneficial for all residents.

Miranda Gray: YES. Greenspace and biodiversity is important but which competing priorities am I balancing here? An environmental lens includes considerations like greenspace preservation when also considering the benefits of densification. The key to building a livable city for now and the future is to consider many elements when making design changes. Councillors will be passing a city master plan which lays out our vision. The decisions made in its context will impact the city for hundreds of years.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Although infill housing is sometimes the more appropriate course of action. I am not fully supportive of saving a housing space , if there is no actual use for the location or if the space is not appropriate for recreational or leisure usage

12. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Rick Bédard: YES. The answer to our energy needs almost certainly lies in a different direction — nuclear power produces long term wastes for which Canada does not have a viable plan for their safe disposal.

Toby Bossert: YES. I will oppose this project unless it is determined to be completely safe by the appropriate government regulators approve the project I will keep an open mind.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. We have the right to a safe drinking water and the release will be affecting all municipalities down stream and I will ad my voice to stop it.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: NO. This is a conditional NO as I am not aware of the plan and has not studies the plan. My answer could change when reviewed.

Jarrod Goldsmith: NO. Much research, planning and environmental protection scenarios must be put into place before any such laboratory is constructed. I have confidence all protective measures will be enacted.

Miranda Gray: YES. Nuclear waste does not belong in our waterways. Period.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. I am opposed to any development that potentially arms any water source. However , if proven risk mitigation measures are in place , these developments should be considered.

Waste Management

13. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Rick Bédard: YES. I believe that at some point Ottawa and Canada will have to move away from plastic bags, which are not only a terrible idea to mix with compost but they are contaminating waterways, rivers, lakes and oceans.

Toby Bossert: NO.

Mireille Brownhill: YES. I was baffled that Council had passed that motion and would definitely fight to have it rescinded.

Guy Desroches: YES. My belief is that plastic bag companies will adapt, with biodegradable products. I will introduce a motion to delay the plastic bags until the correct ones are ready to go.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: NO.

Doug Feltmate: NO. Conditional NO because I am not aware of the process that Orgaworld is using to treat this secondary waste. Before making a decision, I would want to review to process to understand what happens to the liners in this process.

Jarrod Goldsmith: NO. More people who try to recycle in various ways should be encouraged to do so.

Miranda Gray: YES. Our issues with waste stream are huge. Creating good plastic and bad plastic for green bins will not help us achieve better compliance with green bin regulations. It will lead to more green bin waste which can’t be processed. The plan for how plastic will be removed from the green bin material does not appear to be well tested in the field. I’d rather adopt a tested program than fund another “Plasco”. https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/plasco-energy-group-files-for-creditor-protection

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES. Plastic does not belong in a green bin!

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Partial yes, totally opposed to any types of plastics in the green bin program. Not sure what to issue is with dog waste?

14. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Rick Bédard: YES. It may be that spending money on promotion is not the best way to increase Ottawa’s recycling. We have to look at more creative solutions, I think.

Toby Bossert: NO. This may sound like a small number however this represents thousands of dollars that could be better spent elsewhere.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. The promotion to recycling as to be done where people are and this is where the education happens. May be we will have to charge the resident for the second garbage bag and that will generate more recycling.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: NO.

Doug Feltmate: NO. I don’t think spending more money on information will change the attitude of people in Ottawa. We have to start limiting the amount of bagged waste we pick up while not limiting the recycling and green bin programs. Ottawa is a City of entitlement and many feel rules are for others to follow. Its not that they don’t know. As a family of four, we have no problem with one bag of garbage every two weeks.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. Ottawa can always do better to promote communication about recycling. We need additional resources in order to adequately promote a communications plan for recycling. There is often (unfortunately), a cost to awareness.

Miranda Gray: NO. As the largest not-quite officially bilingual city, we will need to match funding of leading cities to reach residents in both French and English. We should also review if we can adopt the same rules on both sides of the river. As someone who currently works in Gatineau, I am often confused by the differences in the waste management strategies of the two cities.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: NO. It’s difficult to agree to triple the funding but I believe we need a full audit of the City’s waste management services. If after that it was determined that the community could use more education then I would commit to any necessary actions..

Catherine Kitts: NO.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Again, a qualified yes.I agree that we should increase the funds spent on recycling education. I think tha dollar figure average per household should be studied and adjusted to ensure we increase our percent.

15. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Rick Bédard: YES. There has to be better ways of tackling these issues. For example, Japan’s plastic recycling rate is 77%. Rather than re-inventing the wheel, let’s see what other nations and other cities are doing and learn from that.

Toby Bossert: YES.

Mireille Brownhill: YES.

Guy Desroches: YES. May be we will have to charge the resident for the second garbage bag and that will generate more recycling. This will not be a popular policy, to improve recycling this most likely as to happen.

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: YES.

Doug Feltmate: YES. Waste handling should be review frequently to ensure processes and methods meet the current technologies. A waste management plan should not be a static document but rather a dynamic plan that is constantly evolving.

Jarrod Goldsmith: YES. I understand the City has a 10 year implementation plan: https://ottawa.ca/en/residents/garbage-and-recycling/solid-waste-data-and-reports

Miranda Gray: YES. The city amster plan needs to include a waster management plan, both to keep our costs down and to meet our environmental targets.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: YES.

Catherine Kitts: YES.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: YES.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: YES. Agree, the existing is not dng the job, it needs to be adjusted, and the goal needs to be aggressive

16. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Rick Bédard: If you look at the full context of my answers including all comments, you will see that Rick Bédard is committed to a sustainable Ottawa — not only from the point of view of energy and recycling but also making Ottawa economically successful because it is a green city.

Toby Bossert: I will consult with other cities about their waste disposal strategies to see what we can learn from each other. I will advocate for more green space, parks and public spaces in new housing developments to make them more sustainable and more community friendly. I will also advocate for better public transit in the suburbs to help take more cars off the road.

Mireille Brownhill: The health of our community is very important, and the environment in which we live plays a big role. I will support recommendations from organisations such as Ecology Ottawa, put forth a motion to rescind allowing plastic bags in the green bins, support better and updated waste management solutions and encourage safe and green road design in my ward as well as others.

Guy Desroches:

Diego Elizondo:

Dina Epale: I will work with key stakeholders to identify current and future concerns.

Doug Feltmate: My focus for Ward 1 is to reduce commuters on the road and the environmental cost that goes with that . In the community of Orleans, we export 80% of our employment to other parts of the City. The major employer in Ottawa Gatineau is the Federal government with 140,000 +/- employees yet there are on 50 Federal jobs in Orleans, a community that makes up over 15% of the regional population. The inclusion of a Federal Government employment node (located on the LRT) in the City Plan makes common sense.

Jarrod Goldsmith: Upgrading aging infrastructure in parks, planting more trees in neighborhoods, intersections etc, implementing increased pedestrian and bicycle traffic where applicable in conjunction with Phase 2 of LRT.

Miranda Gray: I am already quite involved in the Transit and Transportation committees. Looking at their planned work for the next few years, I want to apply the environmental lens to their development of the transportation master plan.

Geoffrey Nicholas Griplas: I would like to see solar panels on all City of Ottawa buildings. I’m also not opposed to forcing builders to install solar panels on all new developments.

Catherine Kitts: I think that many of the issues raised in this survey are important and critical as we continue to grow the City of Ottawa. In areas where commitments have been made, I promise to urge council to take action and move these plans forward. The environment and our responsibility to take care of the planet is not something we can afford to procrastinate any longer. Complete streets, greenspace and green infrastructure will be crucial considerations to Orléans communities as the LRT Confederation Line extends east in Phase 2. I’d also like to see increased funding for the Ski Heritage Trail that would allow the 8km trail to be used for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, fat-tire cycling and walking in the winter months.

Shannon Kramer:

Matthew Luloff: I will work to make public spaces more accessible to pedestrians and cyclists. I will look to other large Canadian municipalities for best practices to reduce our impact on the environment. I will be a champion for waste diversion in Orleans and look for innovative solutions to our waste issues. I will respect our green spaces and advocate for outdoor activities.

Qamar Masood:

Louise Soyez:

Kevin Tetreault:

Don Yetman: In short , support effective biking infrastructure, champion community spaces, ensure LRT is efficiently run to promoted high usage levels. Make Ottawa more pedestrian friendly

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Ward 2 – Innes

Renewable City

1.Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch:

Francois Trepanier: YES. Yes: I will make climate action a priority.  I can only influence the remainder of the Council.

2. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES

Francois Trepanier: YES. I fully agree that once every four years is not enough to accurately track progress.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES

Francois Trepanier: YES. Again, I agree to support such initiative; however, you must remember that as a Councillor, I am only one vote. In addition, I commit to petition other Councillors so that they fully understand the impacts of their vote, if they are opposing.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES.

Francois Trepanier: YES. I commit to support the revision of the Official Plan.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. It’s a yes and no answer. Residents in the south part of Innes Ward need better road network. They cannot depend on transit as the local routes are not practical.

Francois Trepanier: YES. These elements of safe cycling and safe pedestrian pathways are part of my current platform, along with improved public transit and the reduction of automobile traffic, through the creation of employment in East Ottawa.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. We have to ensure Innes Ward residents are not forgotten, especially those in the south part of our ward.

Francois Trepanier: YES. I fully agree, the radius should be increased to 5km and I commit to support such initiative.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. We have to ensure that residents have proper and safe pedestrian/cycling connectivity.

Francois Trepanier: YES. Absolutely, this makes complete sense for new or “plan to be rebuilt” streets. However, it may be difficult to apply to existing streets. Regardless, existing streets should also be given consideration for such improvements.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES.

Francois Trepanier: YES. Yes, Vision Zero makes perfect sense to me. Reducing speed and separating vehicle traffic from pedestrian and cyclists can only help reduce injuries and fatalities.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES.

Francois Trepanier: YES. We also need to consider the amalgamation of projects such as the creation of meaningful employment through the implementation of the Urban Forest Management Plan.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. Although I agree and would love to adopt this, I don’t think the City is ready to fully implement it at this time.

Francois Trepanier: YES. As a Councillor, I cannot ensure such thing; however, I can commit to promote the integration of green infrastructure wherever possible.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. We should also try to preserve as many mature trees as possible when developing.

Francois Trepanier: YES. Not only preserve the current green space, but also develop new ones.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES.

Francois Trepanier: YES. Yes, absolutely and unequivocally.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Laura Dudas: NO.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: NO.

Francois Trepanier: NO. I cannot commit to rescind that decision. The real question here is if there is no evidence that plastic bags will encourage more people to compost, WHY has the Council agree to such decision?

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES.

Francois Trepanier: YES. However, we need to look at other jurisdictions that have a higher success rate than Ottawa and determine from there to what factors they attribute their success. If education is the key, then yes, we should spend more money on education.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Laura Dudas: YES.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson:

Tammy Lynch: YES. More education for residents on recycling and green bin use. I also want to see recycling in all City Parks!

Francois Trepanier: YES. I agree, seven years is too long for a strategy review, especially when it concerns a field that is always evolving, such as waste management.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Laura Dudas: We have seen examples of new green technology initiatives being implemented by cities around the world to become more sustainable and environmentally innovative. If given the right support from Council, Ottawa could become a world leader in environmental technology development and implementation. This is something that would be a natural fit for our city because of our track record of being home to some of the top innovative and technology companies in the country.

Donna Leith-Gudbranson: Environmental and sustainability issues are important to me. My goal as a candidate in this municipal election is to become a fiscally responsible councillor who can find the right balance among all the competing needs in the City of Ottawa.  Climate action, looking at infrastructure investments through a climate lens, increasing cycling and affordable public transit infrastructure and many of your suggested programs are all laudable and important to consider in planning and policy making at the municipal level.

One of my priorities as a councillor will be to organize a series of East-end Summits bringing together the four east-end councillors, community associations, developers, businesses, residents, groups like Ecology Ottawa, city planners, etc.  The goal of these Summits would be to get interested parties together to work on a global vision of how we want to develop and grow the east-end of Ottawa in a sustainably responsible way.

Tammy Lynch: tammy@tammylynch.ca

Francois Trepanier: I will continue to promote and support environmental initiatives, much as I do in my daily life and as you can see on my platform. We need to consider electric busses for OC Transpo, safer protected bike and pedestrian lanes and continue to consider environmental impacts and solutions to every city projects.

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Ward 3 – Barrhaven

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Franklin Epape: YES. we need to protect our climate on a global perspective, at the municipal level ? yes we need to increase funding and staffing commitments.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. This world is our habitat, if we want to stay healthy we need our habitat to be clean & safe. I advocate for cost effective reduction in green house gases and I will defintely favour cost effective programs.

Hadi Wess:

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Franklin Epape: YES. Yes because more accurate are the report and more frequently they are received, like on a early base , more efficiently we can react on climate changes in our city.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Franklin Epape: YES. Yes because is a MOST ; for us to have a healthy watersheds, protect our trees etc we need this adaption plan within our term.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Franklin Epape: YES. Yes and more so, by prioritizing bike and foot, it not only to alleviate traffic congestion, its also protect our environment and it promote healthy citizens .This will help us to save in our health budget as well.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. Its true that widening road does not alleviate traffic congestion, but it doesmake traffic flow better, lesser slower traffic results lesser emmissions. Since LRT was eliminated for Barrhaven back in 2006, incumbant failed to table any new suggestion until this rececent study launch, which will have zero output, costing us $600K. There is an alternative plan, which I think can work better than this and cost effective too. I will not disclose at this moment as this is my major stand in coming elections. I strongly favour more bike lanes in community & more visible speed limit signs

Hadi Wess:

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. We are not going to have LRT in near future, this is one in, must to do list, where housing market in Ward is seeing growth every year, people have more distance to cover to reach there access point/work

Hadi Wess:

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Franklin Epape: YES. Yes we need to protect pedestrians and cyclists , reason why Councillor leadership is vital to ensuring streets are as “complete” as possible this is why we need a counselor that care about the well being of their people not developers .

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. In order to make it more effective, where our focus in decades towards education of drivers only, I strongly recommend that there must be a Cyclist & Padestrian hand book too. We cannot make roads and street safer if, every one using them is not educated towards their resposibilities. Need to start awareness in schools. What we are doing nowadays, is not sufficient for future need.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. Answer to question 3, also covers part of this; education at every level.

Hadi Wess:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. The way we pollute the air, it needs to be purified now and only trees can do this.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. For me, it should be mandatory for developers & builders, if they are removing one tree, they will put three in their plan.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. There should be another solution, not at the risk of our lives.

Hadi Wess:

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES.

Hadi Wess:

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Franklin Epape: YES.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: YES.

Atiq Qureshi: YES. But funds should not be coming out of the pockets of those who are good residents. Will look for the implementation of surcharge to those who are not partcipating properly in recycling process.

Hadi Wess:

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Franklin Epape: I would fight tooth and nail for our ward residence on development but clearly with due diligence. We need Healthy Watersheds, Complete Streets, Cycling, Pedestrians and Public Transit,protect our , I’m here to protect my residence, their well being 1st.

Jan Harder*:

Ahmad Malgarai: Ottawa is surrounded by and is part of a spectacular natural environment, which includes our trees, wildlife, parks and river. It is the pride of many, and preserving, protecting and celebrating it is ranked by the residents of this great city of us as one of the most important goals of our community. Water, energy and waste reduction plays a more significant role in our environmental commitment to future generations. Together, these goals are a shared responsibility amongst residents, businesses, City Council and City staff. City Council must set a priority to be a leader in environmental stewardship, and they should move toward that goal. Thanks to the dedication and actions of the residents and organization like yours. Public input should be used as a fundamental tools in helping to shape and guide our community’s environmental priorities. If elected I will show to the resident that a combined effort is required to achieve our grandest expectations as a community. We must frequently update the Environmental Master Plan outlines the goals, targets and initiatives of four elements: air, land, water and people, which contribute not only to our economic foundation, but to a safe, healthy, inclusive community. The plan should be based on public input, built on previous actions, and strives toward new heights in environmental stewardship. On behalf of my family, thank you for the dedication and commitment our environment. Your passion is helping to cultivate a greener community that we can enjoy today and future generations tomorrow.

Atiq Qureshi: Make safer roads for pedestrian and bicycles, revision of waste management program by introducing more colors to it. Household/businesses which will not participle fully, will fund the extra cost.

Hadi Wess:

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Ward 4 – Kanata North

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. I would also like to see the City of Ottawa explore the possibility of having a designated Planning & Development Commissioner to ensure that the plans the city puts forward, and that developers submit for approval, are in proper balance with environment, addressing climate change and preserving nature. No plan should be able to move forward without a proper assessment/grading system conducted by said Commissioner. Failure to obtain a minimum of a B+ rating on aspects listed above should prevent the plan from moving forward until it has been sufficiently revised.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES. It is essential to have more data and an understanding of emissions to inform future decisions.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES. Let’s also investigate and understand how we can integrate green infrastructure ideas. They present engaging opportunities for our city.

Matt Muirhead: YES. As stated in response to question 1, this underscores the importance of a Planning & Environment Commissioner.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES. Yes. I have long advocated for better cycling infrastructure in Kanata, and indeed city-wide, and have been a leading voice in the community calling for LRT to Kanata. Right now the plan leaves Kanata out until the 2031 – 2048 funding period which is unacceptable. If I’m elected on October 22, this community will be heard from loud and clear at City Hall that Kanata – and indeed, the West – deserves to be in the plan now. Not tomorrow. Not next year. My expectation is that the federal and provincial governments should pay full freight on this plan — just like they do in municipalities like Toronto, Hamilton and elsewhere. The time of Ottawa being a poor cousin when it comes to infrastructure funding must end.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. I do believe in prioritizing investments in alternative forms of travel however I will still be seeking some much needed road infrastructure investments that have lapsed/not yet happened and are critical to our growing community. I.e., Campeau Road extension is a must, and widening of March Road and Carling is a priority.

 

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: NO. Under the current plan and current leadership, Kanata has been left out of light rail plans until my kids are middle-aged. The topic is moot in this ward until we are part of the plan.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. Although I would love to see this happen, I don’t believe it is feasible in this term of Council in Kanata North. Our transit is currently very inefficient, and LRT is not coming anytime soon. I support growing the connectivity planning radius, but in the short term our ward needs transit service that works.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. Absolutely. This is the only way forward.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES. And it starts right here in Kanata North where too many streets are used as defacto race tracks with people speeding through residential areas, where proper signage is lacking, where people have been told that their concerns on speed and road safety are unwarranted. That stops if I’m elected.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. I will happily work on this issue for implementation on all future infrastructure development and explore the opportunity to assess city road infrastructure as budgets allow.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES. As Councillor I will aggressively promote the leaving in tact of existing forests and natural environment here in Kanata North. My priority is to get back to the late Bill Teron’s vision for this community — one that sought to strike a balance between environment and development to ensure that one didn’t come at the expense of the other. We have lost our way here in Kanata North and the results speak for themselves: deforestation across the ward, moonscaping of land along Goulbourn Forced and the Beaver Pond is in danger of flooding, threatening homes that abet it because the impervious surfaces of pavement are looming on this side of the Carp watershed. If I’m elected, the only people I represent is the residents of this community — which is why I am self-funding my campaign and refusing any donations from individuals that do business with the City. (including principals of development and construction companies).

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES. As long as the budget is available to do so, I believe this is a priority as our City grows and invests in infrastructure.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: NO.

Matt Muirhead: NO. We need more residents taking part in this program. If we don’t meet them half-way, the program will fail as evidenced over the last number of years.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: NO. I will commit to exploring the issue further and look to the research to support and inform my decision.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: NO. Taxpayers in Kanata North already have a heavy enough tax burden and I’m not going to put another tax on their bill. With simple reallocation of existing resources, and ensuring the program is meeting the needs of residents, I believe we can achieve a higher level of compliance.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: NO. Tripling the budget sounds great on paper but may not be achievable in the current fiscal environment. I support increasing funding for this activity, but I won’t commit to tripling the budget without further context and deliberating other priorities at the same time. I believe we can do better and should be better as a City.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Philip Bloedow: YES.

David Gourlay: YES.

Matt Muirhead: YES. Yes, provided the program can be made easier for residents.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Philip Bloedow: I have been asked by a businessman in the US to choose 100,000 households to receive FREE solar panels

David Gourlay: I am engaged on the environment file to play a leadership role on Council with respect to the key issues Ecology Ottawa’s survey has identified. I am grateful for Kanata North’s natural space and I am committed to opportunities to preserve, evolve and build on this space. I am also intrigued by the innovations behind green infrastructure and the potential it has for our City. Finally, I agree that we are too reliant on vehicles as my vision is to have a community (locally and across Ottawa) that is more walkable, cycling friendly and liveable. I believe it is time for a Western Ottawa (beyond the planned Moodie link) well before the early 2030’s to avoid total reliance on vehicles.

Matt Muirhead: It starts and ends with development in my view. Under my leadership in Kanata North, environment and nature preservation will take priority over the plans of developers who want big box stores, cookie cutter houses and more money in their pockets at the expense of a livable community. Additionally, I will continue to be an aggressive advocate of sustainable transit solutions as I have been for years, not just at election time when it’s politically expedient to do so. My priorities in that regard are light rail to Kanata, fully funded by the federal and provincial governments, and major improvements to in-community transit  bus service in Kanata. The service level has declined, and continued to degrade since 2014, despite the residents of this community paying more on their tax bill. That has to end. Transit officials will be held accountable to the people in this ward. They deserve a transit system that works for them. Additionally, I will make it a priority to have a dog park in this ward before the 2022 election. It has been a priority for years in this ward but nothing has been done about it. That changes if I’m elected on October 22. Lastly, the lands across from Kanata Centrum – now slated to be the Bill Teron Park that I have long advocated for – will be preserved and enhanced for families and citizens across this ward and around Ottawa. I want a version of Central Park here in Ottawa – Bill deserves no less – where nature and community combine to make something truly special and memorable.

Lorne Neufeldt:

Jenna Sudds: I am committed to our future. I will champion: increased promotion of recycling/waste diversion programs, strive for a bylaw on green roofs, support complete streets and adoption of green infrastructure when possible, preserve greenspace, seek a bylaw on single use plastics, and better environmental planning for our future.

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Ward 5 – West Carleton-March

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES. We live in a rural ward where owning and driving a car is a requirement and distances make cycling and walking challenging or impossible. Affordable, rurally-appropriate transit and other approaches such as carpooling need to be researched and options shared with residents.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES. My first priority will be to review the village design plans for Carp and Constance Bay to fulfill the commitments made to safe, walkable and cyclable streets.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES. As an elected representative I will need to understand how and why this decision was made and what the ramifications of rescinding would be. Not having been privy to the debate and compromises that led to this decision I am uncomfortable with making a firm commitment to rescinding. However, my understanding of best practices leads me to believe there are other, better, ways of increasing composting levels.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Eli El-Chantiry*:

James Parsons:

Judy Varga-Toth: Recognising that the impacts of climate change are all around us and that the residents and particularly farmers of Ottawa and West Carleton-March are being impacted by floods, droughts, incursions of pest and weeds, etc. it is important to pro-actively engage with the communities I represent, to share best practices from other Canadian and international jurisdictions and, together with my council colleagues, take our efforts beyond words and plans. We all need a sustainable future and the nation’s capital must be a leader in this respect.

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Ward 6 – Stittsville

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Glen Gower: YES. Municipalities can – and should – play a leadership role on environmental issues, particularly in regards to infrastructure investments in light rail and rapid transit.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Glen Gower: YES. City council needs meaningful and timely reporting to ensure effective decision-making.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Glen Gower: YES.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Glen Gower: YES. Healthy development is one of the three main pillars of my campaign, including initiatives such as limiting the urban boundary, building walkable neighbourhoods supported by reliable transit, and the protection and expansion of natural areas and greenspace.

Shad Qadri*:

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Glen Gower: YES. Any responsible decision on infrastructure spending needs to be made through a long-term lens with a focus on affordability and effectiveness. I support the overall prioritization of investment in pedestrian, cycling and affordable public transit as the most economical way to meet the demands of future growth and ensure greater mobility for all road users — including motorists. However, I do want to be clear that in Stittsville, there are two priority road projects that are required to ensure connectivity and mobility for residents: The completion of Robert Grant Avenue from Abbott to Palladium, and the modernization of Carp Road. These roads are “missing links” in Stittsville’s transportation network that will also include pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, and bus rapid transit along Robert Grant.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Glen Gower: YES. The City of Ottawa’s future investment in light rail to Hazeldean Road in Stittsville presents an opportunity to improving overall connectivity in our community.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Glen Gower: YES. It should be acknowledged that the current “complete streets” approach is not a perfect one. We need to continually refine our infrastructure design based on the experiences of all road users and best practices from other municipalities.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Glen Gower: YES. Road safety is clearly top of mind for voters in Stittsville. It is one of the top 2 issues I’ve heard about at the door during this election. We should learn from the experience in Edmonton, where they’ve seen a 60% decrease in injuries and fatalities from collisions between 2006 and 2016. I’d like to see similar approaches adopted here in Ottawa around enforcement, education and road design.

Shad Qadri*:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Glen Gower: YES. To be successful, the UFMP needs strong leadership and support from local councillors within their ward. I will champion protection of the existing urban tree canopy in Stittsville, and supporting initiatives to plant additional trees in the community.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Glen Gower: YES. To go one step further, I’d like to see the City introduce incentives that reward property owners who make improvements to stormwater management. For example, Kitchener-Waterloo introduced a system to reduce stormwater fees by up to 45% for residents and businesses who installed flood prevention controls or pollution reduction controls.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Glen Gower: YES. Yes, greenspace preservation is a key factor in building healthy neighbourhoods and is a priority for many residents in Stittsville.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Glen Gower: YES.

Shad Qadri*:

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Glen Gower: YES. I would only support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners if this was replaced by the ability to use compostable plastic bag liners, similar to the system in place in many other Ontario municipalities.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Glen Gower: YES.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Glen Gower: YES. Ottawa’s waste management is a disaster, with a diversion rate under 50% — far below the municipal average in Ontario. City council has an extremely poor track record on waste management – from the Orgaworld contract, to Plasco, to the roll-out of the green bin program and bi-weekly garbage collection. As far as I’m concerned, I’m ready to consider any idea to improve our diversion rates and deliver a cost-effective waste program for residents and businesses.

Shad Qadri*:

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Glen Gower: City Council should aim high on environmental issues, and aim to be a leader rather than a follower among Canadian municipalities. Two priorities that are most important to me are creating an effective waste management strategy, and stronger protection and enhancement for urban forest and greenspace.

Shad Qadri*:

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Ward 7 – Bay

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. Agreed. We need to invest more in infrastructure such as storm sewers to protect our rivers.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. While the environment is certainly a priority, at this time I am not able to commit to any funding or staffing changes until after I have had an opportunity/access to the scope of the city’s finances. As many are aware, the City of Ottawa has been operating for a number of years on a rough framework whereby any increase in funding need to be offset by savings elsewhere, so as to avoid a drastic increase in taxes. It is for this reason, in part, that I do not wish to commit to any concrete funding changes until closer to the start of the budget process

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. This needs to be a regular obligation.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. Barring any cost or logistical implications, for example, I am not against updating the frequency of reporting.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. This should be developed in consultation with residents.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. Barring any cost or logistical implications, for example, I am not against exploring why development of such a plan appears to be stalled.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. Absolutely! There is opportunity with LRT arriving to create more walkable communities.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. Barring any cost or logistical implications, for example, I am not against exploring making such development a priority, at some level.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. We need more proactive policies to reduce our reliance on cars.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. No. While I do believe in the intention of the city’s “complete streets” concept for example, I personally do not believe in a concept of effectively penalizing users of automobiles. On the surface, users of all travel types (motorized vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, transit, etc.) all pay taxes and accordingly, should all benefit from said taxes. While I certainly believe that future growth within the ward is important and should be done in a way that the majority of residents will benefit from, I also believe that we should not neglect our existing infrastructure. An obvious concern is areas where cyclists, especially children, are cycling on roadways that are riddled with pot holes (for example) and that cyclist needs to swerve to avoid a pothole, putting themselves into traffic and the potential for an accident – not to mention the potential damage to vehicles (including city owned vehicles) by said potholes. An example within the ward is Richmond Road, roughly between Carling Avenue and the bridge over the Sir John A. MacDonald Parkway. Though it was beneficial that a Eastbound segregated bike lane was installed, the roadway itself was not repaired around the same time and therefore those same safety issues are still present, especially in the Westbound direction.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Erica Dath: NO.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. This will require a staged expansion of our transit system.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. I believe that as our infrastructure is updated/renewed and expanded, it should be done in such a fashion that benefits the majority of users. Not all transit hubs are the same and therefore a “one size fits all” approach may not necessarily be the best course of action. A good example would be Lincoln Fields, during the 2014 campaign I brought up the issue of a lack of a park & ride facility at that transit station and the fact that a number of vehicles park at the adjacent shopping centre, against the wishes of said property owner. Then incumbent council candidate Taylor advised that it was city policy to not have park & ride facilities inside of the greenbelt.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. We will have opportunities to build complete streets as LRT reaches our neighbourhoods.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. I already touched on the complete streets topic when addressing question #1.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. This is long overdue. As a school trustee I have seen the need for safer streets.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. Obviously any serious injury or loss of life is tragic. We must always try to make our communities safer. Barring any cost or logistical implications, for example, I am not against exploring the possibility of the creation of a similar policy in Ottawa.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. I believe trees should be treated as infrastructure.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. While the environment is certainly a priority, at this time I am not able to commit to any funding or staffing changes until after I have had an opportunity/access to the scope of the city’s finances. That being said, I do believe that we need to take reasonable steps to try to maintain “mature” and “soon to be mature” trees, with public safety being paramount though.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. As a resident of Belltown I have seen increased flooding in our community.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. Barring any cost or logistical implications, for example, I am not against exploring “jump starting” the pilot project, in order to determine the overall feasibility.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. This needs to include protection of the Greenbelt.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. I do fully agree that usable greenspace & our mature tree canopies are both important components within our communities. That being said however, I believe community safety should be a paramount priority. Therefore, respectfully, sometimes trees would need to be trimmed and/or removed with regards to damage & disease. This may additionally be the case, for example, where trees may pose a hazard where they are too close to a roadway, be it existing or expanded. While I know and agree that saving a mature growth tree (or trees) is important, I do personally believe that the prudent choice would be removal in order, for example, to straighten/widen a section of roadway that is accident prone and therefore a potential hazard to human life.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. Absolutely. This is a real threat to the quality of our water.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. Although one of the city’s water treatment plants is located within Bay Ward, respectfully, the safety of the city’s drinking water is not solely the responsibility of one ward councillor. While I am not necessarily opposed to city council discussing the sending of such a letter of opposition, I do also believe that individual letters from residents to their respective MPs & MPPs certainly cannot hurt either.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: NO. I believe this policy will increase the use of green bins, and decrease the total waste going to landfills. For this reason I would not rescind it.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. We need to work towards a reduction of single use plastic bags.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. I am typically not in favour of trying to break an existing contract, unless significant gains can be made, especially if there is a need to offset penalties for example. That being said, I believe we do need to regularly take a look at all of our waste diversion programs. Having multiple programs in place does not make sense if people do not wish to use them. We need to ensure that the programs are user friendly towards residents so that they are actually used to their potential.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Erica Dath: NO.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES. Recycling needs more promotion and encouragement.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: NO. While I do believe that it is important to encourage recycling, at this time I am not able to commit to any funding or staffing changes until after I have had an opportunity/access to the scope of the city’s finances. Although a very small part of the city’s overall budget, increasing that promotional budget by $1/household is still a six figure increase. Said funds would need to be found somewhere, be it by cutting a service somewhere else, or by raising taxes. For example, I am not sure that the majority of taxpayers would appreciate taxes being increased, essentially in order for the city to tell them to recycle more.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Erica Dath: YES.

Don Dransfield: YES.

Theresa Kavanagh: YES.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: YES. I do believe that all plans/strategies/policies/procedures, etc. do need to be kept up to date. That being said, I believe that something as reliant upon residents as waste diversion is, solutions are best sourced from the users themselves. Forcing solutions onto residents city wide may not necessarily be the best course of action – an example being the very vocal opposition to the green bin program, but with different reasons for the opposition in different parts of the city. Targets are always a great thing to set, but if they are set where there is no “buy in” by the end users, they may not necessarily be the most realistic or achievable targets.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Erica Dath: I will support initiatives and programs that involve responsible and sustainable environmental preservation considerations.

Don Dransfield: I have a proven record of taking action on the environment. As an executive member of the Capital Region Citizens Coalition for the Protection of the Environment, I spent years advocating on many of the issues mentioned in this survey. It is one of my reasons for running in this election.

Theresa Kavanagh: I would like to see the ban on single use plastics for starters. We also need to work towards as much self sufficiency in energy use in city facilities.

Marc Lugert:

Trevor Robinson: If elected, I will work with my council colleagues (and city staff, partners & stakeholders) to make Ottawa a better place to live and be a well known city for such, not simply for the environment.

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Ward 8 – College

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Rick Chiarelli*: 

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Rick Chiarelli*: 

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery:YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: NO. I would prefer reducing plastics before they enter our homes, such as regulating packaging or other measures in the Industrial, Commercial & Institutional (IC&I) sector, rather than re-introducing restrictions for those using the green bin.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES. I’m supportive of comparing our communications efforts against other cities, however would caution that larger advertising budgets do not always lead to better results.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: YES.

Ryan Kennery: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Rick Chiarelli*:

Emilie Coyle: We need to ensure that we have the necessary local data to take informed and responsible action on climate change and environmental issues at the City of Ottawa. I will support increasing reporting frequency on both existing and emerging environmental issues. In addition, I would seek ways for the City of Ottawa to collaborate with other levels of government on existing climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. I also think the City can play an important role in education on climate issues and would look to creating more opportunities for increased engagement on this topic with residents of Ottawa.

Ryan Kennery: We have a lot to be proud of in the nation’s capital. It’s up to us to protect it. City Hall needs to do more to increase our waste diversion rate and ensure we do our part in addressing climate change. Building light rail transit to our area, while protecting bus service, pedestrian access, and cycling connections during construction, will also be a priority in the years ahead.

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Ward 9 – Knoxdale-Merivale

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. Pollution is a serious issue and climate change is one of many symtoms.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. I’m not sure what is involved in this but I will give it serious consideration.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES. I will do my best to advocate for an increase in the frequency of the emission reporting. I believe it is important to understand and assess the extent of Climate Change. Frequent assessment will allow us to work towards the City goal of reducing greenhouse gases.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.I am very interested in doing our part to help lower polution in the city.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. We need to start using our heavy rail system that we already have in place. This will give an immediate solution to many commuters in order to get to via (minutes from downtown) in a fraction fo the time it takes to drive.

Keith Egli*: YES. I would support a multimodal approach to meeting the demands of future growth in the city.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES. Yes, I support an increase in infrastructure for alternative means of travel and I will be an advocate for these means. However I will maintain our current roadways to ensure overall safety and ease for our community.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES. I would support staff studying this option and reporting back to Council for direction.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES. I would support staff studying this option and reporting back to Council for direction.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. This is also an issue of safety as well as environmental.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. City Council passed a motion in 2017 to prevent snow plows from coming out until 7cm of snow falls as well as reduce the amount of snow taken away after. You can not equate human life to a dollar value.

Keith Egli*: YES. Staff was directed by the Transportation Committee which I chair to study this approach and report back in the next term of Council. I look forward to this report and the discussion and potential paths forward it will generate.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. The more trees the better.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. Plastic bags are being addressed world wide. It is a very serious issue that needs addressing.

Keith Egli*: NO.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES. There is no way this should be acceptable. There can be other programs in place where we can reuse our green bin waste as compost to our communities and garden if we educate the public accurately. Our problem here, is we our not inforcing rules and regulations that promote a more sustainable Ottawa.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES. This needs to be addressed. Education is a great place to start.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES. To get everybody on board, it is all about education to the public. People do not like change in order to improve our recycling we need to educate and promote incentives to living green.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: YES.

Keith Egli*: YES.

Luigi Mangone: YES.

Peter Anthony Weber: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Warren Arshinoff:

James Dean: I had high hopes for Plasco. It’s is very disappointing that it was not successful. Waste to energy is very important for all communities. A waste to energy plan would encouraged.

Keith Egli*: I hope to be a sitting member of the Environment and Climate Protection Committee in the next term of Council if I am fortunate enough to be re-elected. I want to push the concept of more effective waste diversion city wide and believe the city should provide a more robust public education program. One of my key concerns is the protection of the trees in ward communities such Trend-Arlington and Pineglen. One of my campaign proposals is to set up a ward based Environment Advisory Committee. I will work with this committee in a collaborative manner to better understand and advocate for the environmental needs of my ward and the city as a whole.

Luigi Mangone: Making sure I vote based on environmental policies that have already been passed and introduce new motions that will make ottawa a leader,. Ex. Bee city, banning PFOAs and increasing community gardens

Peter Anthony Weber: As an Ottawa leader I will advocate for public education on green initiatives and environmental issues. I will promote green opportunities where applicable. As the capital of Canada we have to be the leader in addressing our changing climate.

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Ward 10 – Gloucester-Southgate

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. Funding is important, but funding alone will not be the solution. We have been wasting tax-payer dollars on roads due to pot hole/street asphalt being incompatible, that money could have been diverted towards other programs. I would advocate for exploring eco-friendly alternatives, where we become more efficient & save in the long run.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I believe that the environment should be taken into account for all new city infrastructure projects. With this in mind I will advocate for my fellow councillors to take the environment into account while voting.

Robert Swaita:

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. It would be ideal to have a yearly report on air quality & climate change at the City level, I would be in favor of it. I would also consider a two/three year gap between reports a success if we are unable to get a yearly report, considering this a good starting point for the future.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I will strive to increase the frequency of these reports. However a rapid increase to once a year could be too much of a burden to the administrative system of the city.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. Ecology Ottawa already does a great job sharing strategies with residents, flooding preventative strategies such as planting trees/shrubs in front of homes so that the roots act as water absorbents. I am enthusiastic at the opportunity to work with Eco-experts considering my expertise lay elsewhere.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I believe that this is very important. My desire would be to ensure that the Climate Adaption Plan is fully written and up to date with modern and achievable goals.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. I would advocate for environmentally-friendly development, with safer & more liveable neighbourhoods, a big priority for me. That said, it may be a challenge, considering the Provincial Government will be ending the carbon tax.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I support this and will work with city stakeholders to assure healthy living in our community. The 2013 Ottawa Pedestrian Plan focuses on bicycle lanes and a pedestrian walkway network.

Robert Swaita:

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: NO. While I strongly believe in alternative transport, Ottawa is expected to grow 30%-50% in size, the influx of residents will require careful detail. I think it should be a healthy balanced approach, whatever we decide lets get it right the first time.

Perry Sabourin: YES. I’m not sure about prioritizing pedestrian, cycling and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure, but perhaps in conjunction.

Sam Soucy: YES. While renewing the city’s infrastructure I will advocate to incorporate safer paths for pedestrians and cyclists taking into account future growth in the ward.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: NO. From my understanding 600 meters has been decided on after consultations with experts. If a need shows up to widen the connectivity I would be open to it whatever the distance.

Perry Sabourin: NO. I would need more information to understand why Ecology Ottawa suggests five kilometers as opposed to another distance. It seems random without further explanation.

Sam Soucy: NO. Expanding the radius is something I would be willing to explore, however further information would need to be collected before implementation.

Robert Swaita:

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. As it stands our roads are so bad, in such dangerous shape for both cyclists & automobiles, complete streets are necessary & I would ensure they be built in our ward. We also have to make sure that when we build streets, that we do not cheap out on quality, a problem which has been prevalent to date.

Perry Sabourin: YES. If that is actually what people residing in my ward want, then yes.

Sam Soucy: YES.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. So many parents/children have lost children/parents due to dangerous driving, I always intended to push for Vision Zero policy, one of my four priorities “sustainable development & road safety”.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I believe it is my duty as a councillor to make our city streets as safe as possible.

Robert Swaita:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. Forest Management is very important especially in Gloucester-Southgate, especially if you hear from the residents of Gladeview Private that are right by the Green Belt. Those tax payers have seen community fencing damaged in part to inaction, having to pay out of pocket for fixes. As a G-7 capital this is unacceptable & I will do better.

Perry Sabourin: YES. If funding is available in an environment of competing priorities.

Sam Soucy: YES. Not only do I fully support this, but by having a significant part of the Greenbelt in my Ward the protection of Ottawa’s tree canopies is important to me.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES.

Perry Sabourin: YES. I would ensure the integration of green infrastructure if funding is available; assuming it costs more than it usually does to complete these kinds of projects.

Sam Soucy: YES. Assuming that the results of the pilot project are positive, I would support a more wide scale implementation of these policies.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. It is my priority to maintain the integrity of Ottawa & keep it from becoming over developed at the expense of greenspace. Green preservation & meaningful interaction with community associations is important & I am committed to both.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. Green spaces are essential to a healthy, vibrant community. As a growing city we have a unique opportunity to consider greenspaces in all future developments.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. While these Nuclear buildings are built with worst case scenarios in mind, it is not worth the risk to Ottawa & I will be very vocal against it. I am certain there are more removed locations that could serve as an alternative to Ottawa River.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. As a councillor the safety of my citizens is of the utmost importance. I do not believe that having nuclear waste upstream from Ottawa is a wise course of action.

Robert Swaita:

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: NO. This is something that I would need more information on before I could make a final decision.

Perry Sabourin: NO. The city of Toronto allows people to use plastic bags and it seems to work there. Perhaps we need to explore their approach.

Sam Soucy: NO. The contract having been signed, I will advocate to have those changes discussed at the next contract negotiation.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: NO. From a marketing perspective, where are they going to advertise & how much are they paying. I want to make sure we stop misspending & just throwing away money, similar to how we have been wasting taxpayer dollars on incompatible roads.

Perry Sabourin: YES. I would support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for a reasonable period of time to see if it increases our 44% waste recycling rate. Perhaps there are other reasons why our rate is lower that need to be explored.

Sam Soucy: YES.

Robert Swaita:

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: YES. I would be open to the idea of looking over the current waste management plan (2011) & seeing what we could improve. As we grow in size, it is normal for old plans to become obsolete, we just have to make sure not to fall to far behind.

Perry Sabourin: YES.

Sam Soucy: YES. I will push council to increase Ottawa’s waste diversion target.

Robert Swaita:

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Diane Deans*:

Alek Golijanin: My expertise & background is not in environmental development, I would establish a close relationship with Ecology Ottawa experts & co. early on, seeking input when the time comes. When possible we should always strive for eco-friendly alternatives, I will not have all the answers, however working together & as a community, we definitely will!

Perry Sabourin: I will consult with and seek input from Ecology Ottawa and other interested parties on environmental issues.

Sam Soucy: I believe in the City of Ottawa and I believe it is important to protect its future – especially the environment. A large part of Ward 10 is the Greenbelt, which is protected by the National Capital Commission. As citizens of Ottawa we need to do our part in protecting the environment and wildlife we have in Ottawa, therefore I think it is very important for Ottawa to cut down on waste, and that starts with limiting the use of plastic in our city. I envision Ottawa joining cities around the world like Malibu and Vancouver in phasing out single use plastic from our city and switch to alternatives; like bamboo or paper. I strive to build a greener, cleaner, more sustainable City. While I recognize that there is always more to be done, I believe that this is a good first step for the city.

Robert Swaita:

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Ward 11 – Beacon Hill-Cyrville

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Michael Schurter: NO. I will work with like minded councillors to ensure that climate change and the environment are a consideration however the environment, the city and local business work best when they move forward in lockstep and not in direct competition.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Michael Schurter: NO. Without knowing more about the reporting process, the costs and the scientific research behind it I am really not in a position to tell council what would be an appropriate reporting timeline. I am unfamiliar with the reporting process of Montreal and Edmonton and would not know better if you told me they reported weekly or monthly. I will absolutely commit to work with council and review the reporting timeline, take full briefings from all interested parties and come to a logical decision. It may be to report annually.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Michael Schurter: YES.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Michael Schurter: NO. I would work to make sure it is a priority but to add “top-priority” opens the door to allowing opposing councillors to over-politicizes the issues and use the environment as a political tool. I will work with like minded councillors to ensure that climate change and the environment are a consideration however the environment, the city and local business work best when they move forward in lockstep and not in direct competition.

Tim Tierney*:

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Michael Schurter: YES. In a city the size of Ottawa, traffic is problematic however the best strategies towards a greener Ottawa occur when the city, business and environment work towards a common goal. Removing cars from the roadways where possible makes sense to everyone and ensuring that pedestrian, cycling and affordable public transit are safe and reliable we can move towards having fewer cars on the road. Where possible we should be looking to alternatives, although auto infrastructure will be necessary and unavoidable.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Michael Schurter: NO. LRT connectivity is a priority. The light-rail is no good to anyone if it’s not accessible. People will take all different modes of transportation to connect to the light rail and the city needs to listen to the public concerns and observe their actions. I do not know the reason behind the city’s proposed 600m and the proposed 5 kilometres but hard numbers may not be the answer. It is possible that some stations have different needs and require a different standard. These all need to be taken into consideration.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Michael Schurter: YES. Where reasonable for the city and desireable to residents the complete streets policy appears to benefit everyone.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Michael Schurter: YES. This will be a major undertaking but can start with simple and low/no cost changes. Motorists and pedestrians need to be able to safely share the streets. The city needs a simple, understandable and balanced plan to deal with these unavoidable deaths.

Tim Tierney*:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Michael Schurter: NO. I am not fully aware of the city’s current forestry plan but will review it and make an assessment. I am proud to have chosen Ottawa as my home, part of my choice was based on the vibrant green spaces and urban forestry. I believe in long term plans when it comes to the environment and properly funding your strategy while avoiding wasteful program spending.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Michael Schurter: YES. Wherever possible and realistic we need to embrace proven new technologies.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Michael Schurter: NO. Development and green space need to go hand in hand. Communities are more desirable with urban public and private green spaces and Beacon Hill-Cyrville is arguably one of the best examples of that in the city. Green space preservation and good development can go hand in hand. I will work to strike that delicate balance.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Michael Schurter: NO. My understanding of the project is that it will be limited to low level waste such as contaminated equipment from the operation of nuclear power plants (like protective shoe covers and clothing, rags, mops, equipment and tools). https://www.cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca/eng/resources/news-room/letters/near-surface-disposal-facility-project.cfm. These are items that are already there by the nature of having a nuclear facility. In addition CNSC staff also live and work in communities along the Ottawa River, and have not only a professional regulatory obligation related to the project, but also a personal interest in ensuring safety. (Same source) That being said, if the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission finds that based on their study the site is not compatible I would absolutely oppose it.

Tim Tierney*:

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Michael Schurter: NO. The Orgaworld contract is one of the worst in the history of the city. “Put or Pay” has been a failure. If nothing more this step may encourage people to use the green bin for more than dog waste and integrate it’s use into daily life. It’s an example of the city making the best of a particularly bad situation.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Michael Schurter: YES. With a focus on green bins to help reduce our costs and increase waste diversion.

Tim Tierney:

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Michael Schurter: YES. Being a leader in something as beneficial as waste diversion makes sense for the city. I would look for a revenue neutral approach that would help us to aim for this goal.

Tim Tierney*:

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Michael Schurter: Smart and sustainable development would be a major concern for me. The best way to preserve the environment is to find an efficient balance where it is in the best interest of business to also work in the best interests of the environment. New developments with LRT connectivity take the stress off our roadways. Green space implemented into a development makes the community more desirable and keeps our city green.

Tim Tierney*:

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Ward 12 – Rideau-Vanier

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. As a councillor I have felt first-hand the need for action on the climate front. We have directly seen the impact of climate change in our city; just consider the weather this summer. I was very active on the environment front over my first term. Going into the 2018 term of council priority, I do believe that climate action, in terms of data and in terms of smart infrastructure and technology investments is essential. As for the staffing commitment, I believe that an external agent should be in charge of evaluating the City’s performance compared to its own climate plan, which will bring more independent oversight and automatically insist on appropriate resourcing. To me climate change action is more than a plan, it’s an approach to ensure smart evidence-based decision making and planning for our future.

Thierry Harris: YES. I will wholeheartedly support this initiative provided we can put in place specific milestones to be achieved and clear measures of success.

Matt Lowe: YES. I think that the citys current actions will increase emmisions.Look what they did t the 12 bus. Stopping it early.Now forcing peopel to walk or take alternate transpo to their destinations . So much for a modal plan there.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, the external agent would require yearly emissions reporting to properly conduct an annual evaluation.

Thierry Harris: YES. As the Nation’s Capital we should be leading, not trailing other cities especially when it comes to the quality of the air we breathe.

Matt Lowe: YES. pending logistics of the study process a 2 year cycle.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, the external agent could provide an overview to council of measures taken across the country and around the world, which will bring preparedness and ensure focused investments.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES. Proactive stocking of supply in case of another flood like last year.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, we have worked closely with Ecology Ottawa and other community partners to implement a successful Complete Streets policy for the City of Ottawa. I am glad to continue those efforts to encourage greener, mixed-income, mixed-use developments and everything surrounding those reviews and approvals. These policies are crucial for the protection of our environment and also play an important role in achieving desirable communities.

Thierry Harris: YES. Buildings are some of the biggest polluters in our city. It’s crucial to incentivize developers to build smarter. At the same time, we also need to invest in training for city employees and provide them with support so they can better manage our spaces based on the policies we set. It’s really about having a long-term vision and a holistic shift towards a more sustainable community.

Matt Lowe: YES. We should not only tender the price of the contractor on projects but on estimated fuel usage with fines if over budget and over fuel burnt predictions

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, I led the charge with colleagues to pass the Complete Streets policy for that exact purpose.

Thierry Harris: YES. My goal is to balance our environmental priorities with my community’s travel needs. As taxpayers, we are footing the bill for our city’s infrastructure. It is our right to have clean, safe, accessible and reliable streets and public transportation. These priorities were made abundantly clear to my opponent over the years. In my term at council, I will focus on action.

Matt Lowe: YES. We need a better modal plan that works with out interference by OC Transpo cutting routes forcing people to drive now.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. I am excited for the official opening of the LRT. I believe it will change our City forever. Once the LRT is open there is no question that transit affordability and transit planning need to be reviewed to ensure that ridership goals are met and also to ensure that local transit routes see improvements. Before adjusting the planning radius to 5 km I would require more evidence to understand the pertinence of that distance. However, I am certainly open to reviewing it to ensure an increase in transit use post LRT.

Thierry Harris: YES. I would also lobby to have future stations built in Vanier. Vanier is one of the most populous, economically and culturally significant neighbourhood in this city. It is unthinkable that my opponent allowed Vanier to be left behind with the LRT.

Matt Lowe: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, I have worked very hard to ensure that the Complete Streets Policy was approved this last term. We are glad to see it is having an impact on the way the City (specifically infrastructure services) is evolving their public street designs. I am glad to have seen Beechwood, Stewart, McArthur and in the next few months Montreal Road attain those goals. I will ensure complete streets continue to be built in Rideau-Vanier.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. As a member of the Transportation Committee for the last 8 years, I am proud of the progress that has been done to ensure safer infrastructure is built. The future planning of those safe corridors does include the Complete Streets Policy. As for the Vision Zero goals, I believe we need to continue to prioritize existing infrastructure that is unsafe for pedestrians and cyclists. I am glad to pursue the adoption of a Vision Zero Policy for the City of Ottawa. I believe measures like the addition of pedestrian crossovers (PXOs), and local traffic calming measures have helped in improving safety but more needs to be done. The Highway Traffic Act continues to be a main barrier to some of the local goals, including the reduction to 40 km per hour for residential roads.

Thierry Harris: YES. No one should die on our streets, especially not because of poor design. As a cyclist, pedestrian and vice president of my community association in Ward 12, I have seen the lack of leadership on this file over the years. King Edward Avenue is one example. The fact that we still haven’t implemented a city-wide policy really drives home the message that we need a better advocate for Vision Zero at City Hall.

Matt Lowe: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES. Also the unnecessary cutting of good trees needs to stop.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, I believe I was able to demonstrate that commitment over the last 8 years and plan to continue. I have shown this commitment through investing in the revitalization of our parks (Optimiste Park), building the bioretention gardens along Stewart Street, and partnering with Action Sandy Hill for a depaving strategy along Somerset St East.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES. Highly important this is to me. I am a yes on green infrastructure.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES.

Thierry Harris: YES. I would also push for heavy fines for developers who cut trees without permission.

Matt Lowe: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Nuclear waste is a serious concern for the health of our community. I am not well informed on this proposal. However, if there is an industry with plans affecting the safety of our drinking water, it is vital that we prevent this. In similar cases the challenge has been that the municipal realm of authority is limited. Nevertheless, being vocal and intervening on the matter with the help of our provincial and federal elected officials is essential.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES. I am a former NBC decon team member and this stuff is nasty. I know what a leak could do..Big NO for me on this one.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. I voted in favour of the arbitration settlement, as this compromise was decided as part of the existing contract. At the time when the contract will be reviewed, I will be glad to look at all measures to ensure increase in compost use. I believe that the sore point in this issue is the fact that we should have full control over all waste and diversion within the City borders including industrial, commercial and institutional. This would allow City staff, as well as industry and community experts to build a stronger more cohesive waste management plan. We collectively share the same goals: less waste to landfills.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES. Non-compostable plastic bag liners in compost is just senseless.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, the City of Ottawa needs to completely rethink its approach to public education. We are not reaching newcomers, youth or apathetic residents. The City is well-versed with using more traditional media sources and needs to develop an outreach style. I am proud of certain campaigns and would highlight the work of Ottawa Public Health’s team. This being said, we need to inundate residents on multiple platforms with a common and clear message. This also applies to our drinking water quality. Far too many residents are using single-use plastic bottles.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: YES. Yes, we need to do better, there is no question there. We absolutely need to reduce the amount of waste that goes to landfills. Before developing a plan we need to ensure a fundamental shift happens, and that is that the Province of Ontario must give the City of Ottawa ultimate control over all diversion and waste within its territory. A plan that only includes a portion of the residential waste is an incomplete plan and will continue to lead us towards similar results. We must develop a strategy that is applicable to all (including the City) in which we advance our approach to managing waste in Ottawa. Many jurisdictions across the world and Canada have demonstrated a steady progress with modern technologies, and there’s no reason Ottawa cannot be a part of that progress.

Thierry Harris: YES.

Matt Lowe: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Salar Changiz:

Mathieu Fleury*: Over the last eight years, I believe I was able to demonstrate my commitment to greenspace, sustainable transportation and climate change action. If elected, I will commit to pursuing innovation and best practices such as adding green infrastructure and walkable and cycling friendly environments, advocating for a stronger more cohesive waste management plan and by investing in the revitalization of our parks.

Thierry Harris: I will tirelessly advocate to make Ottawa the greenest and most accessible city in the country. Specifically, I will fight for higher standards in the way we BUILD our city. Environmental considerations should be integrated into all aspects of our growth from planning to architecture to roads to public transportation and beyond. Furthermore, I will work to make Ottawa a destination for green businesses and green jobs. I will put our provincial and federal partners to work on attracting investment for innovation so we can develop the next technologies, right here at home, to address environmental problems worldwide. As the Nation’s Capital, Ottawa should be known as a city of superb environmental design and stewardship across all fronts. This bold vision will not only propel us towards a greener future but an economically prosperous one as well. I’m looking forward to working with Ecology Ottawa and their partners in achieving this vision.

Matt Lowe: Yes,between sewage leaks,floods and the changing weather patterns their is clear evidence we need to be proactive in this.

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Ward 13 – Rideau-Rockcliffe

Tobi Nussbaum provided his response to our survey on August 30th, after the survey deadline.

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES. The high cost of widening roads on our arterial roads – both capital and operating – combined with the fact that induced demand is a well-documented phenomenon means we should be investing in better transit for Ottawa’s residents to provide more efficient mobility choices.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES. I have spoken out over the last four years on the importance of improving the state of our public transit system as well as our active transportation networks. There are many good reasons to ensure a larger number of neighbourhoods have such access to the LRT.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: No response. I don’t know enough about the issue at this point to commit either to opposing it or supporting it. I will say that being concerned about climate change as I am, there is – unfortunately – no realistic path to a carbon free energy future in the time we need to drastically slash greenhouse gas emissions without nuclear power. Whether this facility is the right way to store radioactive waste or not, I will need to research.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES. As one of only 3 Councillors who voted against the decision to allow plastic bags in the organics stream, I would be keen to revisit the issue.  My only caveat to this answer is I would need to understand the financial implications of changing the contract with Orgaworld.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Peter Heyck: YES.

Tobi Nussbaum*: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Peter Heyck: In addition to the above commitments, I will also support a citywide commercial plastic bag ban and plastic straw ban.

Tobi Nussbaum*: There are three important things we need to do to take our place as a truly green capital city and to demonstrate environmental leadership. First, we need to ensure that our growing suburban neighbourhoods are built sustainably. Too often, we fail to offer the residents of our newly built neighbourhoods transportation choice and force them into a situation of car dependence. We need to build the type of mixed-use development that allows residents to walk to shops and services. Second, we need to encourage building energy efficiency, by both investing in municipal buildings and offering a revenue-neutral property-assessed clean energy program to residents. Last, we need to improve transit services and our active transportation networks to give residents attractive, low-carbon and safe options to move around our city.

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Ward 14 – Somerset

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! I’m committed to this mandate in order shape the future of our city with sustainable development and to proactively consult with our community and groups like Ecology Ottawa, in order to benefit from your expertise in supporting the environment and mitigating climate change. Oui! Je m’engage dans ce mandat afin de façonner l’avenir de notre ville en matière de développement durable et de consulter proactivement notre communauté et des groupes comme Écologie Ottawa afin de bénéficier de votre expertise en matière de soutien de l’environnement et d’atténuation des changements climatiques.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. Climate change is the single greatest issue facing us today. It must be met with focussed action at all levels of government. At the City of Ottawa, we can meet our commitments to climate change by: – ensuring that City activities, including infrastructure, are viewed through a climate change lens; ensuring that staff report on climate change initiatives annually; and continuing to develop “complete streets”, encouraging walking, cycling, and transit use as primary alternatives to cars.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! More reporting results in better data for effective decision making and implementation of related policies. Oui! D’avantage de rapports résultent dans de meilleures données, ce qui contribue à l’efficacité de la prise de décisions et à la mise en œuvre des politiques liées.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I strongly commit to supporting an increase in the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. City staff are working hard to deliver on climate priorities and I will continue to ensure that we can achieve this goal. Le personnel de la ville d’Ottawa travaille dur pour atteindre les priorités climatiques et je continuerai à faire en sorte que nous puissions réaliser cet objectif.

Catherine McKenney*: YES.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Absolutely! We can encourage sustainable development along with the creation of green space and parks in new developments, that contribute to growing vibrant communities and improving the livability and health of all residents. Absolument! Nous pouvons encourager le développement durable ainsi que la création d’espaces verts et de parcs dans de nouveaux développements, ce qui contribue à l’expansion de communautés dynamiques et à l’amélioration de la qualité de vie et de la santé de tous les résidents.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I believe that a safe and liveable city is one where low-carbon use must be a strong factor, where transit, cycling and walking are all promoted ahead of personal vehicle use. I will fight to ensure that the new Official Plan reflects this, including how we plan and develop our neighbourhoods, and local renewable options for energy use.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! I’m also committed to implementing a “Free Fare Transit Zone” within the downtown core, to encourage movement between LeBreton Flats and Rideau Centre by LRT, and to include all buses traveling North of Somerset street. This will encourage more ridership, and provide affordable access for residents who are going to the new central library. .Oui! Je m’engage également à mettre en place une «zone de transit gratuite» dans le centre-ville afin d’encourager les déplacements entre les plaines LeBreton et Rideau Centre et d’y inclure tous les autobus circulant au nord de la rue Somerset. Cela encouragera une plus grande fréquentation et offrira un accès abordable aux résidents qui se rendent à la nouvelle bibliothèque centrale.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I have been a leader on Council in supporting a complete streets model for all road renewal projects and I have repeatedly fought for cycling, walking and public transit to be considered primary modes of transportation ahead of vehicle use. I will continue to fight for these. Personally I am well-known for using my kick-scooter and bike to get around the ward.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. As part of the light rail transit plan, we must increase sustainable transportation connectivity. I have said so on Council and I commit to improving our connectivity.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! As an avid cyclist and pedestrian, I know the value and importance of complete streets in common-sense city planning! Oui! En tant que cycliste et marcheur passionné, je connais la valeur et l’importance de rues construites selon une planification urbaine de bon sens!

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I have been a leader on Council on complete street initiatives in Somerset Ward and will continue to do so.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! As someone who walks and cycles every day, we need to fight for the safety of everyone especially the most vulnerable road users. Oui! En tant que personne qui marche et fait du vélo tous les jours, on doit se battre pour la sécurité de tous, en particulier les plus vulnérables.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. My family and I use bikes and kick scooters to go to school, work and other activities and I know personally the dangers that users of alternative transportation often face. I am committed to fighting for and adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES. Most people simply don’t want to bike to work or school due to safety alone!

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! We need to ensure the protection of our trees and canopy, especially in the Dalhousie community and Little Italy where our urban forest is most vulnerable to future development. Oui! Nous devons assurer la protection de nos arbres et de notre canopée, en particulier dans la communauté de Dalhousie et dans Little Italy, où notre forêt urbaine est la plus vulnérable au développement futur.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I have worked consistently to preserve our urban forest. IN fact, I have worked with staff to increase the number of trees in the Ward. I am committed to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I remain strongly committed to ensuring green infrastructure is integrated into all projects wherever possible.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES. Climate change is real! Very real!

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Absolutely! I’m committed to green space preservation and have been encouraging all residents of Somerset Ward to plant Local Ontario Wildflowers that I have been handing out! Absolument! Je suis engagé dans la protection des espaces verts et j’encourage tous les résidents du quartier Somerset à planter des fleurs sauvages de l’Ontario que je distribute.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. Protecting and preserving existing greenspace is important, but is not enough. We must increase the amount of greenspace at every opportunity. A recent example was the distribution of 250 trees across the ward to residents that will help to increase our urban tree canopy. I have also worked with my community associations to establish several new community gardens in the ward. I remain committed to preserving and increasing greenspace as part of the City’s planning process.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES. If there are 12 lanes, you’ll still have a 12 lane traffic comes rush hour

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. As a lawyer who has taught and practiced environmental law, this matter is a provincial issue. I will use my expertise and influence as your city councillor to purse this effectively at all levels of government. En tant qu’avocat ayant enseigné et pratiqué le droit de l’environnement, cette question est une problématique provinciale. J’utiliserai mon expertise et mon influence en tant que conseiller municipal pour poursuivre l’efficacité à tous les niveaux du gouvernement.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. As the largest municipality on the Ottawa River, we have an obligation to protect this critical waterway from all kinds of pollution.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. As Councillor, I opposed the motion to include plastic bags in green bins and I will continue to oppose it. We must, as a society, reduce our dependency on single-use plastics and this policy is fundamentally backwards in this regard.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES. Yes! We need to increase spending, and also ensure that it is effectively spent on educating and engaging our community in adopting best practices to encourage recycling, green bin programs and waste prevention. Oui! Nous devons augmenter les dépenses et veiller à ce qu’elles soient effectivement utilisées pour éduquer et impliquer notre communauté dans l’adoption des meilleures pratiques pour encourager le recyclage, les programmes de poubelles vertes et la prévention des déchets.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. Our failure to implement wide-scale recycling and green bin programs for business and multi-residential dwellings is a key contributor to the amount of recyclables and organics that end up in landfill. Better education is one contributing factor, which I support, but we can’t improve until we provide better opportunities for recycling and organics diversion.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES. I am from York Region and I can attest to the fact that we are lacking in Ottawa when it comes to recycling!

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Arthur David: YES.

Jerry Kovacs: YES.

Catherine McKenney*: YES. I support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follows best practices and sets a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa.

Merdod Zopyrus: YES. With a growing population, waste management should be a priority

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Arthur David: If elected as Councillor, I intend to push through ambitious sustainable development policies which are essential for both Sometset Ward and the city of Ottawa. These policies would include the revitalization of Ottawa’s current environmental commitments, promoting environmental stewardship and implementing crucial climate change measures. This environmental and climate policy that I am proposing and intend to pursue if elected will work towards making Ottawa a leader on environmental issues. Because the environment matters to everyone, and when the residents of the nation’s capital succeed in its environmental leadership role, all Canadians can succeed as well.

Jerry Kovacs: As your councillor, my most important job is to listen to you – our neighbours and residents. And as your councillor, the most valuable resource I can provide is my time. We’re growing a vibrant community together in Somerset Ward and I’m thrilled by the amount of local wildflower seeds we’re planting with your help as part of my environmental commitment and leadership for Ottawa during this campaign. These seeds will beautify our neighbourhoods and gardens for years to come! By implementing a free fare zone on transit through the downtown core, we will encourage ridership and increase affordable access of core city services – especially the new central library. This concept will be a key agenda item that I pursue with my fellow Councillors and OC Transpo over the course of my term. I studied, practiced and taught environmental law, and possess a knowledge of municipal land use and planning from my experience in the legal department of an Ontario municipal corporation. This expertise will be invaluable to the residents of Somerset Ward as I fight for sustainable and affordable development with environmental priorities. We need to work together, with experience and passion to grow a vibrant community together! __________________________________________________________________________ En tant que votre conseiller, mon travail le plus important est de vous écouter – voisins et résidents. Et en tant que conseiller, la ressource la plus précieuse que je puisse vous fournir est mon temps. Nous développons une communauté dynamique dans la circonscription de Somerset et je suis ravi de la quantité de graines de fleurs sauvages locales que nous avons planté avec votre aide dans le cadre de mon engagement environnemental et de mon leadership pour Ottawa durant cette campagne. Ces graines embelliront nos quartiers et nos jardins pour les années à venir! En mettant en place une zone de tarification gratuite dans le centre-ville, nous encouragerons l’achalandage et améliorerons l’accès abordable aux services municipaux, en particulier la nouvelle bibliothèque centrale. Ce concept sera un élément clé du programme que je poursuivrai avec mes collègues conseillers et OC Transpo au cours de mon mandat. J’ai étudié, pratiqué et enseigné le droit de l’environnement et possède une connaissance de l’utilisation et de la planification des terres municipales grâce à mon expérience au sein du service juridique d’une société municipale de l’Ontario. Cette expertise sera inestimable pour les résidents de la circonscription de Somerset alors que je me bats pour un développement durable et abordable avec des priorités environnementales. Nous devons travailler ensemble, avec l’expérience et la passion pour développer ensemble une communauté dynamique!

Catherine McKenney*: If re-elected, I will continue to work hard to ensure that we encourage alternate transportation modes and build the infrastructure to support it. I will continue to fight for development that does not contribute to negative energy use. I will work to build a city that is liveable for everyone and that respects our environmental responsibilities. I will also continue to preserve our existing tree canopy and expand it. If re-elected I will also work to have Council consider and support best practices in waste management so that we are not faced with the prospect of adding new landfill and we are not contributing to the amount of plastics in our waste stream. And, I will continue to advocate for increased funding to ensure that our policies, such as Energy Evolution, are adequately funded so that they can be successful.

Merdod Zopyrus: We should recognize the importance and urgency of reducing our emissions in a quantitative way! “It’s probably going down” was Jim Watson’s answer when he was asked about it! Whereas other major cities such as Toronto have a quantitative way of measuring the change in their city’s emission. We are at a stage that ‘good enough’ isn’t really enough at all! As the youngest candidate in the ward, I feel that we need to be much more proactive to secure a better future, not only for our immediate community but our entire planet. Removing or reducing greenspace to widen our streets for more cars would only give us more lanes of congestion! We need to focus and invest in greener ways to address congestion and improving transportation for our citizens!

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Ward 15 – Kitchissippi

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. I have used my vote and voice in this term of Council to resist road widenings paid for from tax dollars where those compromise our transit plans that are a key part of achieving our climate change objectives. Our largest infrastructure investment, in LRT, has a well-documented climate change rationale that is a model for further infrastructure planning. However, beyond LRT, we have more to do to fund, then measure, initiatives that reduce GhGs to achieve our climate change goals.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. In this term of Council, I have twice supported more aggressive GhG reduction goals – most recently by achieving Council’s support for my motion to accelerate the adoption of a more ambitious target. However, without monitoring it is difficult to ascertain whether we’re meeting our goals. Yearly reporting will help make us more accountable for achieving those.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Jeff Leiper*: YES.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. The current Official Plan (OP) appropriately prioritizes intensification (though that is not always implemented thoughtfully) mandated for both its environmental and economic benefits. The key challenges in the next term of Council as we refresh that will be to implement OP policies that provide better protection for greenspace including trees, and especially to resist an expansion of the urban boundary. We must keep in mind that intensification that achieves environmental goals does not mean carte blanche for developers. I will persist in seeking meaningful plans for how we grow, then sticking to those.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. I have a demonstrated track record working proactively to better balance the needs of all road users, including drivers, cyclists and pedestrians, across the ward. I will continue to build on the momentum of ensuring, for example, that Scott Street does not revert to a four-lane car road following the end of the bus detour and will eventually be turned fully into a complete street, and to achieve pedestrian improvements such as the re-building of the Churchill/Richmond intersection. I will persist in seeing cycling infrastructure extended on Richmond Road, as well as traffic calming measures on Byron as those plans have developed this term. I was pleased, with several Council colleagues, to fund a study of how to use City levers to deal with congestion that we will re-visit in the next term.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. The opportunity of LRT, particularly at the completion of Phase 2, is to create new travel choices that don’t rely on the private automobile. I was pleased to initiate full bike access to LRT specifically to support this thrust. I would champion efforts during the refresh of the Transportation Master Plan in the next term of Council to use tools such as those created by Bike Ottawa using funding that I provided to plan for cycling connectivity. I will continue to advocate for an affordable transit system, and the maintenance of our local transit service, which will likely require re-thinking the current fare/tax ratio.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. I have a demonstrated track record working proactively to better balance the needs of all road users, including drivers, cyclists and pedestrians, across the ward. I will continue to build on the momentum of ensuring, for example, that Scott Street does not revert to a four-lane car road following the end of the bus detour and will eventually be turned fully into a complete street, and to achieve pedestrian improvements such as the re-building of the Churchill/Richmond intersection.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. The City has made some progress in this term of Council to implement some elements of Vision Zero, including studying road deaths to understand the contribution of road design to those, but more needs to be done. A key challenge will be to ensure that the funding is available to make the changes needed to achieve Vision Zero. I have already begun advocating for additional funding for the “temporary traffic calming” program that we have used in Kitchissippi to try to achieve the lower speeds that are critical to saving lives and avoiding catastrophic injury.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. Along with Councillor Chernushenko, I was a sponsor of the UFMP (including by successfully asking Council to elevate it to a term of Council priority) and am committed to ensuring it has appropriate funding to be fully implemented. I have also worked extensively on tree issues at the ward and city level, including working with tree advocates to support their efforts.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. Street re-surfacings will have limited potential to integrate green elements, but street re-builds are key opportunities. In order to capitalize on those, I would support a policy and increased budget to incorporate progressive stormwater solutions when renewing road infrastructure. I am pleased to see that the City has begun pilots of measures such as bioswales, and (assuming those are successful) I would support broader rollout of those.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. The current land-use planning regime must be changed in order to prioritize urban greenspace. I have begun in this term of Council to work with senior staff to identify the barriers to accomplishing this in anticipation of achieving the needed changes at the level of the Official Plan and in provincial statutes. Where stronger language is required in the Official Plan to support, for example, the preservation of trees in the face of infill construction, I am committed to working with staff and my Council colleagues to effect that.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Jeff Leiper*: YES.

Daniel Stringer: YES. I joined them a long time ago and have been on the front line of this issue for several years

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. I was a vocal member of the minority of Council that resisted this change, and I would be pleased to support its reversal.

Daniel Stringer: NO.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Jeff Leiper*: YES.I was pleased in this term of Council to work with (and support with my office resources) the work of Waste Watch Ottawa, which has made this recommendation.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Jeff Leiper*: YES. I believe that many of Waste Watch Ottawa’s recommendations (developed with some support from my office) should be implemented to move us along this path. In the upcoming term of Council, we will update our solid waste strategy to account for upcoming changes to provincial producer responsibility regulations, but the WWO recommendations should be implemented regardless.

Daniel Stringer: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Jeff Leiper*:

Daniel Stringer: The City should act to ban the transport of all nuclear waist on its roads or roads to traverse its boundaries. The City should become a leader in lobbying the Federal Government to drastically revise its plan to store North American nuclear waist at Chalk River.

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Ward 16 – River

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Riley Brockington*: YES.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I have indicated on my top priorities as transportation. Through discussion and policy surrounding transportation, climate action will be positively impacted. Transportation in this city must be addressed. By changing the status quo, making public transportation accessible, convenient, and affordable, we work to reduce the use of personal vehicles and engage more people on a sustainable economy that respects and prioritizes our environment.

Kerri Keith: YES. climate action is definitely important for everyone. Of course, I would advocate for an increase in all aspects that support sustainability.

Hassib Reda: YES. It requires substantial planning, but I think in some capacity it should be implemented.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Yes, to properly measure, we need at least annual statistics in order to see progress but also to make changes, where necessary to improve outcomes.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I will commit to finding a plausible way to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting. With the rapidly evolving climate change statistics, I agree that reporting every 4 years is too infrequent.

Kerri Keith: YES. This sounds like a win-win. It helps the environment and increases employment opportunities. I am on board!

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Absolutely.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. Climate change is a real issue that we cannot ignore. It is imperative that we have a plan in place to address and adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding, and invasive species. Growing up in the Democratic Republic of Congo, I experienced severe flooding and know the measures that were required to maintain the physical and economic safety of the people in my region. As we must adapt to the environmental changes we face, a Climate Adaptation Plan will be a necessary step.

Kerri Keith: YES. I would certainly attend these meetings myself to hear what solutions are brought forward. Ottawa is privileged to have a great amount of talent working in the field of clean technologies.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Riley Brockington*: YES. This should be, as a default, part of planning policy. While I am not completely clear on how this will be done and whether the City has the legal authority to make certain initiatives mandatory, particularly those placed on the shoulders of developers, it is time to be more bold and assertive in achieving low carbon results. Before the OP review begins, I will inquire on how this can be done in the context of the review and how much authority the City has in this regard.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I will support and work for a revised official plan that is developed with climate change in mind, because as I have indicated the importance of environmentally minded policy cannot be overstated. Healthier, safer, and more livable neighbourhoods is at the center of my platform and this includes improving the preservation of natural systems and the wise use and protection of these resources. I will support a review of what is in place to support low-carbon development in the River Ward.

Kerri Keith: YES. Absolutely! intensification and public transit are quick and easy ways to address population bursts and sprawl.

Hassib Reda: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Riley Brockington*: YES. I support the efficient and effective movement of people and goods in our City and want to see green modes continue to increase as the total modal share in the City. All modes are important. I continue to push for better connectivity within River Ward, mainly sidewalk installation and sidewalk renewal, as well as safe bike paths and lanes, for both leisure and commuters to/from work and school. To be completely open to those reading my replies, I will also be pushing for greater investment in repairing the existing road network. Not expanding it, but maintaining what we have. The condition of the road network, as well as sidewalks and multi-use pathways, need greater attention. With multiple changes to bus routes with the pending opening of the LRT, my focus with OC Transpo has been to improve its on-time schedule in the ward. Coverage is reasonable, with some exceptions, however, the main complaint is reliability of the schedule.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. My priority is always going to be the well-being of my constituents and in order to support investment in alternative forms of travel – which would absolutely support climate change minded policy – public transportation needs to be reliable, affordable and convenient. If these alternative forms of travel are invested in, they will no doubt be a better option for community members and be the best way to support future growth in travel demand in my ward.

Kerri Keith: YES. I have read George Monbiot and agree wholeheartedly, a lifestyle shift is already adopted by many and must be encouraged through incentivization.

Hassib Reda: YES. Definitely. I think that we should build a strong cycling and public transportation culture, such as in many European cities. Furthermore, I believe we should improve transit so it makes sense.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Yes to expanding the radius, but I am not sure how financially feasible 5kms is. I strongly support safe, direct connections between communities and making it easy and safe to get to public transit is a priority for me and supported in the ward. The City can do better and I support making improvements in this regard.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I will support the prioritization of shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs. The Light Rail Transit will be a great addition to our public transportation system that is in current need of revision and development.

Kerri Keith: YES.

Hassib Reda: YES. In areas with high population density, to start with.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Yes. I supported the complete streets policy and continue to look for ways to make improvements.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I will commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in my ward, the new design in planning stages for Merivale Road being a prime example. I have been in cities in which programs like complete street have made valuable contributions to the transportation of the city, specifically supporting pedestrians and cyclists of all abilities, for example of the city of Antwerp, Belgium.

Kerri Keith: YES. I addressed this in a recent blogpost where I suggest that complete streets should be city-wide, planned and executed with definitive time and place indicators.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Whether we call it a “Vision Zero’ policy or not, the goal of any city should be to design and regulate our streets in a way that reduces the risk of death and injury. I would like to better understand from City staff what the difference is between their current strategies and that of Vision Zero and what the impediments are. That said, any progress that can be made to make our streets safer has my support.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. A Vision Zero policy would support the safety and well-being of my constituents which remains my top priority and if elected I will commit to ensuring this is considered.

Kerri Keith: YES. Managing speed is the first step toward a safe street. Once vehicles slow down, they can see the pedestrians and cyclists and react suitably.

Hassib Reda: YES. Riverside speed limit must be reduced. One of the most dangerous streets in Ottawa.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Riley Brockington*: YES.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. If elected, I will support the implementation and full funding of the strong Urban Forest Management Plan enacted last year.

Kerri Keith: YES. I would like to nominate Diana Beresford-Kroeger to champion.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Riley Brockington*: YES. I would like to get more information from City staff as to the results of the pilot, but I endorse green infrastructure and commit to looking at ways to make better use of it in our city.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. It is essential that we use the policy tools that the City of Ottawa has and move beyond the pilot phase of this project. Albeit wide-scaled, its implementation is essential to adapt our city to new severe weather events that may occur due to climate change. Developing our living and built systems to be adaptable will only ensure the longevity of our city and the well-being of its residents.

Kerri Keith: YES. Yes, yes and more yes. It pains me to hear when someone’s home is flooded, when raw sewage is dumped in the Ottawa River. We need several things here. We need policy and experts to provide not just the damages but the solutions to what is a preventable problem. Look to the ancient gardens of Babylon. water management is possible, it just takes planning.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Riley Brockington*: YES. My understanding is it already is to a degree, but my sense from the question is that it isn’t respected enough. I support making greenspace preservation a greater priority.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. Greenspace preservation should be central in the city planning process because they act as breathing, living spaces that rejuvenate the biodiversity of our city and protect our trees. Protecting spaces like Carlington Hill and Mooney’s Bay Park will be prioritized in the planning of development patterns and consideration of road widenings in our ward.

Kerri Keith: YES. I hope all my fellow councillors will make the city as green as it can be both physically and environmentally.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Riley Brockington*:  YES. I commit to reading/learning more about this matter. I have not paid too much attention to it to be honest. If the threat is real, my answer is yes.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. Of course, I will join them in supporting this opposition. We have seen the negative impact that accidents and waste from Nuclear facilities has on the environment and it would be essential to prevent more from happening. Canada is supposed to be investing in renewable energy and we should come together and focus on support more programs centered there.

Kerri Keith: YES. Chernobyl.

Hassib Reda: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Yes, if after one year, the collection rates have not improved. I acknowledge that the collection of organic waste in plastic bags is both counterintuitive and at odds with a number of local environmental leaders. I am very concerned with the low participation rate of the green bin and that the majority of organic waste is destined for the landfill. This needs to stop now.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. Using non-compostable plastic bag liners produces additional plastic waste that only adds to complications of the disposal process and leads to lower-quality compost. If the purpose of the green bin program is to reduce waste and keep garbage away from landfills, it seems essential that we explore every avenue we can to support waste reduction.

Kerri Keith: YES. Orgaworld. sheesh.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Riley Brockington*: YES. If I had assurances that the investment in advertising/education campaigns would lead to a greater participation rate, then yes, absolutely. Whatever is being done now by the City is ineffective.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. Yes I will support the tripling of funding to promote and educate about recycling and waste prevention. I agreed with the green bin programs and know mass education about how reducing waste impacts the city is initiative that requires the participation of all it’s citizens. Ultimately this investment will likely save the city money overall, as we avoid paying on the back end to create additional landfills and to adapt to senseless waste created.

Kerri Keith: YES. Will provide extra incentivization through resident acknowledgements of green waste mgmt.

Hassib Reda: YES. Perhaps also provide tax credits like they do in San Francisco.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Riley Brockington*: YES. Yes, I strongly support this.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: YES. I will support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan by carefully reviewing and considering what does NOT work about Ottawa’s current strategy.

Kerri Keith: YES.

Hassib Reda: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Riley Brockington*: The mindset on Council has to change. I plan to allow my name to stand for the position of Chair of the Environment and Climate Protection Committee. Council must set aggressive, yet achievable objectives during the Strategic Planning session, based on feedback from local environmental groups, community associations and residents. Advocate for changes to provincial legislation, providing Cities more authority to make bold changes. Climate change initiatives, GHG reduction projects and renewable energy opportunities need to be properly staffed and resourced.A greater public education campaign needs to take place to encourage homeowners, landlords and business owners steps they can take to reduce their impact on the environment and provincial and federal tax credits need to be provided to act as an incentive. The time for the City to take bold action was yesterday.  I will be a strong advocate to move Ottawa’s progress forward.

Fabien Kalala Cimankinda: If elected, I will take 3 steps to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues. First, with all of the environmental challenges we are facing as a result of climate change, I will encourage the city to follow through on current green initiatives and support innovative solutions to combat the effects of climate change here in to Ottawa. Second, I regard the local community as a small but extremely powerful structure that must foster citizen participation in renewable energy initiatives and programs. We must band together to develop and take care of local green spaces. I will encourage community associations and local organizations to be part of the realization of making Ottawa a true living city. Lastly, I am here for the people – our local residents. Through the education and awareness about how climate change and waste reduction will directly impact them and their immediate communities, we will be able to give people immense power to tackle environmental issues locally. For example, the growing understanding about plastic and it’s huge addition to our waste which take years to break down, should be discussed and explored with our local residents, garnering their participation in a proactive elimination of plastic for our everyday use. Ultimately, climate change is global problem with local solutions; we must be that change.

Kerri Keith: I will talk to David and see what he says and then bring in some of my ideas on energy, waste, water and transportation. Look out city council, here I come! 🙂

Hassib Reda: Create a ward-based Environment Advisory Committee that works with organizations such as Ecology Ottawa. Fight and advocate for the protection of our urban green spaces. Develop measures to clean our water and air. Look at providing tax credits for responsible waste management. Require a minimum threshold of green infrastructure in new development projects and provide eco-friendly developers tax incentives. Ensure that any street pavings (or repavings) consider cycling lanes. Provide City of Ottawa employees who organize group rides and educate cyclists on how to safely navigate bike lanes. Improve our public transportation. Have multiple stops along the O-Train. Make it affordable ($2 or less per ride). Other ideas as well.

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Ward 17 – Capital

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. I made climate breakdown a top priority in the last term. Indeed, it was my personal effort that got it placed on the agenda as highly as it was. However, even as chair of the Environment and Climate Protection Committee, you only have one vote, and you are still wrestling for limited resources with dozens of other priorities.

Christine McAllister: YES. It is time for Ottawa to step up to the climate change challenge and I will commit to making this a Term of Council Priority. A strategy for action on climate change for the City, including a plan to achieve short and long-term carbon emission reductions and climate adaptation is needed, and such a plan needs to be funded. This includes providing funding to employ City staff who will do this work as their main priorities. A climate lens on the City’s asset management planning process and for all investment decisions should be included and reported on.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. Yes and no. Once a year is likely too frequent given the amount of resources required to collect and assess that data. A balance is needed between doing the actual program, policy and project work vs spending resources reporting.

Christine McAllister: YES. What gets measured gets managed. Regular reporting is the tool to identify progress and whether there is a need for change in the plan

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. The work is underway.

Christine McAllister: YES. The heat throughout the summer of 2018 has put adaptation top of mind. There are numerous negative impacts of increasing temperatures and bad weather events. Progress on a number of other initiatives discussed in other questions will positively impact climate adaptation and should be included in a strategy to address climate change (see Q1).

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Jide Afolabi: YES. A number of fitting policy proposals are already part of my platform, and are available in summary here: http://bringboldback.ca/ottawa-capital-ward-councillor-candidate-platform/ottawa-capital-ward-councillor-candidate-platform-summary/

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES.

Christine McAllister: YES. The revised Official Plan must be informed by different perspectives, including one that takes into account the impact of development. Making low-carbon development a priority should be included within the context of the overall strategy for action on climate change for the City.

Shawn Menard: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Jide Afolabi: YES. This is exactly why, for example, I have come out against the Alta Vista Transportation Corridor, which would turn green space into a highway: https://twitter.com/CapitalWardJide/status/988519616761778176

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. I am pleased that not only have I supported this in concept, a series of major projects (Main Street, O’Connor bike route, safety measures on Bronson and of course the Flora Footbridge demonstrate my commitment to delivering.

Christine McAllister: YES. Traffic congestion is a particular issue in Capital Ward. While progress has been made on cycling infrastructure, more is needed, in particular along the Bank Street corridor. As councillor, I would Work with City staff to determine how best to establish and implement a safe Bank Street cycling corridor, including over Rideau River and Rideau Canal bridges. Additionally, prioritizing sidewalk snow-plowing to improve winter accessibility is needed. I would also advocated for enhanced OC Transpo services and affordable bus and LRT rates to ensure access and increase ridership.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: NO. I cannot make empty gestures. With all related program/project money cancelled from the provincial government, Ottawa will have a difficult time even delivering on existing commitments. I will follow through on existing commitments, then see how we can go further.

Christine McAllister: YES. The primary objective is to ensure public transportation (LRT and buses) is easily accessible, more convenient and cost effective than driving vehicles to get to points of destination. Options for expanding connectivity should be evaluated against this measure

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. See my elaboration above for evidence. New work is coming on Hawthorne, Greenfield and at several key crossings.

Christine McAllister: YES. Complete streets offer a unique opportunity to increase access to public infrastructure for all residents. There are anticipate road reconstructions in Capital Ward (e.g. Bronson Avenue) which would benefit from a “complete streets” approach. I would advocate that the complete streets policy be the foundation for street planning in Capital Ward.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Jide Afolabi: YES. The prevention of transit-related deaths is a key plank of my platform. Please visit bringboldback.ca

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES.

Christine McAllister: YES. The City of Toronto has a Vision Zero Road Safety Plan which is data-driven and takes a targeted approach. Approaching design from a baseline that considered traffic fatalities and injuries to be preventable will identify opportunities to improve safety for all.

Shawn Menard: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Jide Afolabi: YES. Beyond our tree canopy, I would like to see a green roofs by-law, and the incorporation of extensive green spaces / vertical forests into new, large buildings.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. Absolutely, as chair of ECPC I helped sponsor and guide the process, which led to substantial community engagement and endorsement for the UFMP. I would do the same to oversee its implementation.

Christine McAllister: YES. The Urban Forest Management Plan needs to be fully costed and appropriately resourced, making sure that highest impact action items are implemented as soon as possible, and the entire plan is implemented in less than the currently projected 20 years.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES.

Christine McAllister: YES.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. Some substantial opportunities are coming to purchase important conservation lands. I will work with partner agencies and donors to make this a reality.

Christine McAllister: YES. Encouraging and supporting green infrastructure wherever possible will provide many benefits to the City. This will help improve trees and greenspace and protect local river systems, issues I am committed to.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Jide Afolabi: YES. An uncategorical, resounding yes!

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. Yes and no. We have not yet seen a formal proposal to which we need to respond as a city. Again, I believe in evidence-based work, more than symbolic gestures.

Christine McAllister: YES. I have similar concerns as expressed by the Ottawa Riverkeeper and would advocate the City of Ottawa oppose the proposed permanent nuclear waste dump less than one kilometer from the Ottawa River.

Shawn Menard: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: NO. Rescind is very much the wrong approach, and puts the entire contract in jeopardy. I commit to continuing to make it easier for citizens to divert organics to the green bin, and to moving towards an approved, certified and ready affordable compostable bag that will replace non-compostable wrapping.

Christine McAllister: YES. If elected, I will work to reverse the 2018 Council decision to allow non-compostable plastic bags into the green bin organic stream and find a better solution while also actively exploring appropriate options for reducing single use plastics including bags, straws and Styrofoam in homes, businesses and at major events. I believe we also need better options for disposing of pet waste than allowing it in the green bin.

Shawn Menard: YES. I have been campaigning on banning single use plastics!

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Jide Afolabi: YES.

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. First, this statistic is wrong and misleading. It uses a false comparator. Ottawa is one of the few cities that provides recycling service to multi-residential units. As a result, our percentage participation rate looks far worse when compared to municipalities that only collect from single units, etc. This being said, Ottawa can do much better, and will be bringing forward ideas on how to do this as part of the 2019 waste management plan.

Christine McAllister: YES. I believe more funding than what currently exists is needed for promotion and education to ensure higher recycling rates in Ottawa. I support an increased per household funding, which should be tied to a promotion and education plan to achieve the goal of greater waste diversion. In terms of the amount of funding required, in addition to comparing spending against other large cities, I believe the amount needs to be tied to a plan for success, which may be more or less than $1.50/person. As councillor, I would advocate for a promotion and education plan to increase waste recycling rates that is funded to achieve success. While generally supportive of the level of funding proposed, I would want to a high level of confidence that it is a sufficient amount.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Jide Afolabi: YES. I would go on further and set the target as zero landfill provisioning. If it can be done in Sweden, it can be done here. See my website page on the issue: http://bringboldback.ca/ottawa-capital-ward-councillor-candidate-platform/ottawa-capital-ward-councillor-candidate-waste-to-energy/

Anthony Carricato: YES.

David Chernushenko*: YES. Again, see above for misleading assumptions. Ottawa has been waiting for some years for the regulations under Ontario’s 2016 Waste-Free Ontario Act — Bill 151. With the new government, it will be essential to see how this important work pans out and align Ottawa’s approach accordingly. The city is part of a multi-partner partnership, and does not act alone on waste diversion.

Christine McAllister: YES. The City needs a new waste management strategy and funded implementation plan. Setting a high target, such as 65% would demonstrate leadership and result in many positive benefits for the environment as well as the City’s budget in that we would avoid the need for a new landfill. If elected, I would champion the development and implementation of a city-wide strategy to better manage all waste streams, including increasing rates of composting and recycling and better options for disposing of pet waste.

Shawn Menard: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Jide Afolabi: All of the above, plus a green roofs by-law, zero landfill provisioning, and a ban on single-use plastics. I would listen to other ideas aimed at clear and unequivocal environmental leadership for Ottawa, and not only advocate such ideas but work for their adoption by City Hall. Thanks for the opportunity to comment.

Anthony Carricato: If elected, I will: • Take a stand to ensure that all new development projects meet the highest standards for sustainable development • Encourage proposals that will help Capital Ward and the City of Ottawa reduce its environment footprint and manage environmental events such as major rainfalls through green infrastructure • Explore new ideas to work with the province to improve industrial and commercial waste management • Work with the National Capital Commission and the City of Ottawa’s parks and recreation services to improve the maintenance of parks in the ward • Champion the revitalization of the Rideau Canal and the protection of green spaces and trees • Promote environmentally conscious choices, like ensuring the availability of compost in all buildings, installing recycling bins and containers for pet waste in our city parks, and reducing our use of single use plastics. • Review your traffic and pedestrian crossing concerns and push for changes, such as traffic calming measures, to protect residents and improve walkability and cycling connectivity.

David Chernushenko*: I have dedicated my life to precisely this, and will continue to do so if re-elected. But I have learned that few issues are black and white, and all steps forward need to be thought through or else the pushback will make some work worthless. Witness the imposition of large wind turbine projects on unwilling communities as just one example.

Christine McAllister: My responses to this survey and other environment-related action items are the actions I believe will make a difference in our city. I will approach these issues strategically, with action plans for achieving them, starting with making a strategy a Term of Council Priority. Additionally, there are many other candidates who are mobilized by making progress on environmental issues in the City – I will work with all councillors to generate momentum for change.

Shawn Menard: I would like to see new road building reduced in Ottawa, this includes the AVTC dumping traffic onto Lees Ave. I want to fully fund energy evolution, ban single use plastics and save our urban tree canopy from developer interests. Cycling and walking are critical, meanwhile our high transit fares are resulting in less ridership. Its time to return Ottawa to the people. -Shawn Menard

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Ward 18 – Alta Vista

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. In Budget 2018, the City committed $500,000 in new money for the Energy Evolution. While in comparison, we spent almost $44 million on new road expansion – this needs to change. We need to make greater investments into climate change initiatives for the City of Ottawa. As outlined in the City of Ottawa’s 2014 Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan 89% of the GHG emissions from the City come from two sources: buildings and transportation. Specifically, a key component when making infrastructure investments for the City of Ottawa should be to incorporate climate change considerations during infrastructure planning. We need to follow the lead of the federal government who now requires that major public infrastructure seeking funding consider climate changes risks in the design and operation of infrastructure projects. A climate lens assessment should be rigorously applied at the planning and design stage to help mitigate against the impacts of climate change. Making these investments now will help avoid future costs and better position Ottawa to attract jobs in the green economy. I also believe that by applying a climate lens onto infrastructure investments, we are encouraging and promoting developers to make smarter choices; that are in line with the realities of climate change that all municipalities (including Ottawa) must face head on.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. When elected, I will support making climate action a Term of Council Priority. Climate change is real, it is happening and it is impacting our residents. Council needs to ensure that all investments we make in infrastructure are resilient to our changing climate.

Mike McHarg: YES. Green initiatives always seem to be put on the back-burner because a lot of people consider them ‘less essential’, but that’s not the way it should be. These initiatives help us all. I’m very displeased with our provincial governments decision to end certain initiatives so I will strive to fight for change at the municipal level.

John Redins: YES. It will be nice to meet those requirements but when the funding formula give 6 cents to every municipal tax dollar and a partner fighting climate change tough decisions will have to be made

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I believe there is value to having real data, preferably as close to real time as possible. There is currently a gap in the ability of the city to accurately gather data about community emissions. While Ottawa generally uses estimates, some cities around the world are pursuing pilot projects with other sectors to look at gathering real data and how to more accurately report. This approach can provide valuable feedback to policy and planning decisions to track trends over time and the impacts of any interventions. Specifically, I know this very issue was discussed at the Cities and Climate Change Science Conference in Edmonton. Therefore, I believe that the City should strive to learn from other jurisdictions in applying best practices wherever possible and we should be open to looking at other cities models in order to track community-wide emissions in a more comprehensive manner.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. Given that government decision-making must be evidence-based, annual community-wide emissions reporting data is necessary to determine focus and prioritization. Policy and operational decisions pertaining to the City of Ottawa’s climate goals need to be made on analysis supported by the data produced from the Air Quality and Climate Change Action Management Plan.

Mike McHarg: YES. It’s important to know the current stats of our city so we know how to improve upon it.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I will support the implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan. I firmly believe that a Climate Adaptation Plan should be based on the assessment of the greatest risks and the City of Ottawa’s plan should include identifying the vulnerabilities to these impacts and setting out specific actions to reduce their negative consequences. Before this comes to Council, I would hope that our climate adaption planning would have been undertaken in collaboration with community partners and other levels of government. Just over this last term of council, Ottawa has seen impacts from flooding, severe storms and the expansion of invasive species that are expanding their range and causing threats to our ecosystem. By investing in appropriate adaptation actions the City can reduce future costs associated with these threats.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES.

Mike McHarg: YES. I think Ottawa is lagging far behind in this context. Every year I’ve been waiting for some sort of plan to work towards addressing climate change at the municipal level, but I haven’t seen anything yet.. Which is why I would commit to delivering on a Climate Adaptation Plan for Ottawa.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. Municipal governments should be at the forefront of addressing and managing climate change. Climate Change is a multi-faceted problem that touches on storm-water management, urban design form and energy conservation – to name a few. Therefore, I believe that a City’s Official Plan should reflect these realities. In the case of Ottawa, it will set the groundwork for our City to get much more serious about reducing our greenhouse gas emissions.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. A new Official Plan is a great opportunity for people in our community to have their say and leave their mark on the future vision of Alta Vista and the city of Ottawa. As such, we need to draw on the creativity and expertise of our residents, non-profits and the private sector to anticipate future needs in the plans we make today. This includes a growing population, demand for affordable housing, land use pressures, transportation and a changing climate.

Mike McHarg: YES. This is the first I’m hearing of an Official Plan, but if it helps cities reduce greenhouse gas emissions then I would love to provide my input into this plan to ensure it is successfully employed.

John Redins: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I agree with the statement that widening highways and building new roads does not alleviate traffic congestion. Recently, I read the 2009 study by Matthew Turner and Gilles Duranton entitled: The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion (as cited by Ecology Ottawa in “Seizing the Moment for Safe and Healthy Streets – May 2018) and I prescribe to the finding that more highways and more roads simply creates more cars on roads. It would appear that the Transportation Master Plan will now be updated during the next term of council (2021). I believe this is a real opportunity to prioritize active modes of transportation, and it would present me with a unique opportunity (as Alta Vista’s City Councillor) to ensure that I reach out into the community to bring awareness to local residents about the importance of incorporating multi-modes of transportation into how they travel both within the ward and across the City. As we are scheduled to renew the TMP in 2021 – I will commit to ensuring that residents are aware and are provided with multiple opportunities to raise their collective voices and feed into this discussion. Additionally, improving connectivity and prioritizing pedestrian, cycling and public transit infrastructure is something that is very important to me. I will push hard to take ensure we install the pedestrian bridge between the Train Yards shopping centre (at Industrial Ave) and the new LRT / VIA station in the ward of Alta Vista.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. Alta Vista is a community where people live, work and play – it is not simply a transportation corridor to bring people from the south to the downtown core. As councillor I will champion safe cycling and pedestrian routes and support strategies to leverage the new LRT to bring new riders to public transportation. Personal automobiles and delivery vehicles are not simply disappearing but they are changing and changing quickly. The largest auto manufacturers in the world are actively transitioning to ‘personal mobility’ companies as autonomous and electric vehicles are going to change the future of personal transportation. The city needs to be making infrastructure investments that will make sense 40 years from now, not just for the next 5.

Mike McHarg: YES. I think the car has reigned supreme in our cities for far too long. I would love to do a study into how to make Alta Vista a more friendly place for all to travel within. I recently studied how Barcelona was taking back their streets by creating ‘superblocks’ in their city. This option might not be feasible because our cities are designed differently but I’d love to explore more about this topic.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. Ecology Ottawa correctly cites that Transit Oriented Development Plans for LRT stations must, in many instances, deal with the built environment that has already been developed around transit sites. This can in many instances present a unique challenge as each site is not exactly the same. That is why I do not believe that a one-size fits all approach regarding connectivity is the most effective way to systematically bring more pathways, sidewalks and bike lanes to active transportation users. I do strongly support looking at each and every opportunity to increase connectivity. In this light, I would suggest that we systematically look at every viable option in an effort to increase connectivity beyond the 600 meter radius. As an example, in the ward of Alta Vista, I firmly believe that installing a pedestrian bridge from the new LRT / VIA station into the Trainyards shopping centre would better connect Alta Vista to public transit while providing greater ease of access for residents to access shopping and the services offered.

Raylene Lang-Dion: NO. The City of Ottawa’s $3.1 billon investment in light rail transit (LRT) infrastructure underscores the city’s commitment to smart transportation policy. Given that the LRT is not yet in-service, I favour completing the analysis regarding the efficacy of the City’s current plan for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs.

Mike McHarg: NO. While I do think it’s very important to build connectivity into our transit hubs, I would need more information about widening the connectivity planning radius before going further.

John Redins: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. In 2013, City Council adopted a Complete Streets policy that put more emphasis on designing streets for all users (pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users, as well as cars). I believe that successful cities are those that have neighborhoods where residents are able to walk and bike easily to local parks, transit stations and to access shopping. I recently read that over 12% of all retail sales in Canada is done through online shopping. With this in mind, I believe we need to think about how to promote local business in our communities and make it easier for local residents to go shopping by using either their feet or by using their bikes – the City’s Complete Street Policy is a big step in this direction, because it encourages multi-modes of transportation and encourages residents that when they walk outside of their home to get that bag of milk – they can easily walk or ride. It is for this reason, that when I led the negotiations on the $300 million Elmvale Mall redevelopment (beginning in 2015 as President of the Elmvale Acres Community Association within the ward of AltaVista) I worked very hard to listen to residents about how we could transform a street near the mall; Othello Avenue. After much discussion with city staff, residents and the developer, I am very proud to report that Othello Avenue will be turned into a Complete Street and this will transform how residents can move in and around the mall and access their local shopping. I am also confident that it will reduce the amount of vehicle traffic in and around the mall – which was one of the main concerns of the community. Moving forward, I will apply the same level of energy and rigor to ensure that streets within Alta Vista put a priority on pedestrian and cycling.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. I commit to ensuring that for all new and retrofit transportation infrastructure projects, a coherent, cost-effective and smart complete streets approach be used in those projects, ensuring that the end-results works for all, and that pedestrian and cycling needs are an integral and foundational part of those projects. In Alta Vista Ward, a lot of basic infrastructure is either missing or is incomplete, such as sidewalks that end unexpectedly or cycling lanes that are unconnected to a coherent and/or existing network. I will work to ensure that a more thoughtful and cohesive approach to complete streets be implemented in Alta Vista to create a transportation network that works for all.

Mike McHarg: YES. Cycling and walking are healthier alternatives for our citizens and our environment. I would commit to doing whatever possible to increase the number people commuting this way

John Redins: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. The Vision Zero policy is about recognizing that traffic deaths and injuries are preventable, and improving the safety of roadways through education, enforcement, engineering, evaluation and engagement. The City of Ottawa should immediately adopt a strong “Vision Zero” Policy. I firmly believe that Ottawa can and should set aggressive targets and report publicly on our progress in this area.
What could this look like?
While talking to residents during the campaign we have discussed at length how we can make our roads safer. During these conversations, there have also been many discussions about the underlying reasons why residents sometimes feel unsafe on City roads. I have heard concerns about distracted drivers, motorists ignoring the laws, lack of segregated bike lanes and unsafe sidewalks and pedestrian crossings. We can really start to address these concerns if we as a City, adopt a strong “Vision Zero” Policy. This would mean that we aggressively evaluate how the City educates, engages and ultimately engineers its roadways in an attempt to eliminate fatalities and major injuries from its roadways.
These metrics could include measurable initiatives to track progress including: greater implementation of road safety and educational campaigns, greater emphasis on proactive road safety measures like signalized right turns and protected left turn signals (where applicable).
I believe the key is to set a strategic path forward, with an aggressive action plan that can be tracked to monitor progress.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. I would be interested in learning more about the best practices, lessons learned and investments required to implementing a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa.

Mike McHarg: YES. I hate to see any preventable deaths occur. This should be a top priority if we truly want our citizens to be safe.

John Redins: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I have spoken with many, many residents in Alta Vista who are concerned about the overall state of our urban canopy. Two concerns in particular have been brought to my attention and both are mentioned in the context of specific recommendations made in the Urban Forest Management Plan (UFMP.)
1.) Many residents are concerned with the ever increasing number of infill developments going into Alta Vista and how this will affect our urban canopy. Specifically, I have been told that there have been instances where large mature trees have been cut down to accommodate new infill developments. Recommendation #8 in the UFMP calls for a review and update of the City’s Tree By-laws which could among other things improve the overall effectiveness of the Urban Tree Conservation By-Law.
2.) Many residents have also told me that they are dismayed that many of the new trees being planted along Alta Vista streets seem to be in very bad shape or have died. I was pleased to see that Recommendation #16 addresses maintenance levels for newly planted street and park trees. We need to ensure that when the City is investing money into trees to preserve and enhance our urban canopy that we are protecting our investments. Simply put, we need to ensure that as a City we increase maintenance requirements on new trees including mulching, watering and pruning to ensure our trees thrive within our community.
We have taken the time and effort to develop Ottawa’s Urban Forest Management Plan (UFMP) and I have heard from Alta Vista residents that this is important. We must now ensure that we implement and fund the UFMP accordingly.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. I commit to supporting the adoption of a strong Urban Forest Management Plan for the City of Ottawa. Ottawa is recognized as a “green city” due to its parks, green spaces and forest canopy. We need to work to ensure that the city’s green canopy is not only maintained but strengthened through the cooperation, participation and commitment of all sectors of government (federal, provincial and the city), educational institutions, private sector organisations, stakeholders and citizens towards it.

Mike McHarg: YES. Trees are the underrated saviours of our city.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. In October 2017, Alta Vista saw some significant residential flooding. As context, the expected 100 year rainfall (ie: a storm which would be expected once every 100 years) is 103mm over 24 hours. The nearest monitoring station, close to Hawthorne Public School, in the ward of Alta Vista recorded 134mm, which was the 2nd highest reading in the Ottawa area – most of Ottawa was closer to 100mm. When I met with City officials to obtain more information on resident’s flooded basements I was told that because most of the sewer system is quite old in Alta Vista, there are areas where the sewers may have damage, partial blockages, or insufficient slope (which can lead to flow problems). Such deficiencies, where present, may have contributed to sewer backups & flooded basements when the pipes are at their limit. However, there is a real role for green infrastructure initiatives as it can be used to better manage wet weather impacts as a result of climate change by reducing the amount of rainwater into our sewers. We need to be smarter and more innovative in how we spend public money. One of the ways to accomplish this in the context of combatting the effects of climate change is through the implementation of green infrastructure. I could not agree more that we need to move beyond green infrastructure experimentation to much more widespread implementation. I believe that as a City we must move toward this goal and I am prepared to have Alta Vista be one of the wards leading this charge. Partnering with local landscape companies and small business and working with residents within the ward to install infiltration swales and rain gardens (especially where we have lost some of our biggest trees) would be an initial first step and serve many functions: it would reduce the amount of rainwater going into our sewers, it would build a shared sense of community and it would help bring the message on a larger scale to the ward about what green infrastructure is and why it is important. As City Councillor, I will ensure that residents are engaged on this subject and that I not only promote but also champion green infrastructure initiatives.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. When elected, I will work to ensure all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure —wherever possible. Tying the complete street approach to new and updated road and transportation infrastructure and green co-development objectives will not only enhance the landscape and environment that we live in, but also support environmental development objectives for the city.

Mike McHarg: YES. YES. I think we need to follow Berlins model of becoming a sponge city. Mandatory green roofs on developments, permeable pavements to reduce stress on our sewage treatment centre and to cool down our city on hot days. I want our city to be a leader in this category.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I will commit to make greenspace preservation a key component of the planning process. Having spoken with Alta Vista residents at their doors as well as reaching out to them through the Alta Vista Survey (that I created to ensure community voices were heard) residents have told me that they strongly value the urban green space and trees in our community. In the context of future development and intensification, I believe that conserving mature trees and ensuring access to green space is important to the health of our residents. Studies have repeatedly shown that trees and green space confer benefits to residents on health and well being (e.g. reducing impacts of heat, noise pollution) as well as the associated environmental benefits. I will be a strong voice at the Council table on this issue and will make prioritizing greenspace a top priority within the ward.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. I will commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process. Green urban development and transportation infrastructure expansion projects can go hand-in-hand in enhancing the environmental footprint of the city. I would support the development and implementation of guidelines and bylaws that would oblige developers to implement enhanced greening measures of the local landscape in new and redevelopment projects. For example, when new subdivisions or commercial developments are planned for, we should ensure that these new development plans not only replace but enhance the green canopy and ensure a minimum proportion of land for public green space. In Alta Vista for example, we should ensure that development plans for Elmvale Acres shopping centre and for the new Timbercreek development are obliged to implement a physical environmental plan that will prioritize an enhanced greening of the local landscape and enhanced public park spaces.

Mike McHarg: YES. I will commit to protecting our current greenspace, and also on increasing the amount of total greenspace.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. When elected, I will join the mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities in opposing the development of a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa.

Mike McHarg: YES. This waterway is crucial to so many people. It would be preposterous if this construction were to go through.

John Redins: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. Yes. I think most would agree that the original contract was flawed from the start. It called for the City of Ottawa to pay for a minimum of 80,000 tonnes of organic waste at the cost of $8 million dollars a year but the problem is that the City has never come close to delivering that amount of waste; so it would be fair to say that for some time we have not been getting value for money. In my opinion, the recent decision by Council to allow plastic bags into the green bin is a flawed one. I understand that, during committee hearings, City staff were unable to confirm the exact percentage that the technology (being used by the contractor) would actually separate the plastic from the organic material. This causes me real concern from an environmental perspective. Let’s be honest, we are at this point because for years many Ottawa residents have not been using their green bins and as a result we have been coming in well below the 80,000 tonnes of organic waste to the tune of $8 million dollars per year. However, do we need to jump to this measure by introducing plastic into the green bin? I believe we don’t. My wife is always telling me to compost and her answer to the sticky, smelly problem that many residents have complained about is to simply use a plastic bag in the container to house the compost. We then carry it out into the green bin and dump the contents. In many instances, we rinse the plastic bag off and then simply use it again. We use a paper liner in our green bin. I honestly do not feel that this recent decision provides any more value for residents. I do not believe it will somehow magically convince people to start using their green bins more and perhaps more importantly, I am uncomfortable knowing that I do not have full assurance on the amount of residual plastic material that will be mixed in with our organic waste. I would have preferred to see more investment into education, awareness and promotion about the three R’s, rather than putting a band-aid on the large wound that is the Orgaworld contract.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. Yes however, the City’s decision to amend its green waste management contract must allow an opportunity for Orgaworld to deliver on its commitment and for the City of Ottawa, including the City of Ottawa’s auditor general, to potentially evaluate results.

Mike McHarg: YES. That always confused me… Yes, it makes composting easier, but we shouldn’t be creating more waste and degrade the quality of our compost.

John Redins: YES. I stated on CBC Radio 4 years ago that we stress education of waste management

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. While speaking with residents at the door about this issue, many have made the point that people do not recycle properly. They have told me that they see all sorts of things in their neighbour’s blue box that simply should not be there. So, in thinking about this answer, I decided to do some reading about HOW we can educate and promote in a more effective way. I came upon a number of articles, but one in particular stood out. It was written by Mr. Calvin Lakhan who is working out of the Department of Environmental Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. Mr. Lakhan published an article in 2016 that looked at the effectiveness of recycling promotion and education initiatives. His belief is that if Ontario hopes to improve in this area, recycling promotion and education need to be tailored to target specific materials (for example: which are not presently being recovered, i.e, composite packaging). I could not agree more, we need to increase funding to at least $1.50 per household, but let’s be smart about how we reach out to residents. I would like to see more funding goes into this initiative. I would also like to see that our promotion and awareness campaigns be more tailored to specific materials, in order to better address issues “at the curb”. And as I mentioned in a previous answer, we need to be more strategic in how we put information in front of residents. In an effort to make recycling easier, the City of Ottawa launched an app that tells people among other things, what can go into their blue box, black box and green bin. The app is available on Apple and Android devices and although it is available on the City’s website. I was disappointed to see that the app was not on the websites of every City Councillor. I believe we should not expect residents to scroll through the City’s website to find information on programs or initiatives like this one.

Raylene Lang-Dion: NO. In my experience, successful issue-based and social change public education campaigns are not solely reliant on expending resources in this way. We can find other ways to work with partners and stakeholders to amplify our messaging to encourage increased recycling and composting behaviour. Think along the lines of a high school or post-secondary social marketing challenge that would take on and implement this initiative as an example. Understanding the barriers to citizens adopting waste prevention, recycling and green bin programs need to be assessed first. Additionally, understanding what areas of the city have a higher or lower adoption rate may assist in targeting messaging to improve diversion rates amongst residents. For example, what policies need to be implemented to address why Ottawans living in condos and apartment buildings should not be mandated to recycle and waste separation at source. We can better work with developers in their planning for new residential developments and with existing community associations to further implement better waste diversion practices.

Mike McHarg: YES. I believe education is the most important tool we have in increasing our waste recycling rate. San Francisco has been able to achieve a rate of 80% through city wide education programs, as well as working with manufacturers to create products with recyclability in mind.

John Redins: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Jean Cloutier*:

Clinton Cowan: YES.

Kevin Kit: YES. I will support the development of a revised waste management strategy and diversion action plan. I would like to see Ottawa set a realistic short term target of a 55% diversion rate. By reaching 55% Ottawa would fall well above the provincial average (approximately 47%) and it would extend the lifespan of the Trail Road landfill site by close to ten full years from 2045 to 2055). It is correct that York Region has a 65% diversion rate and is the leading municipality in the province. However, it is important to note that York Region does allow diapers, and plastic liners in their green bins. (I mentioned in a previous answer my opposition to including plastics in the green bin). York Region also uses incineration as one of their methods and incineration can be quite expensive, and can produce toxic emissions that can be difficult to mitigate. I want to be clear that I believe we need to better enhance the waste management strategy – because a 42% diversion rate is simply not acceptable. Any new strategy should include aggressive measures to more effectively promote and educate residents about waste reduction as well as targeting multi-residential units including apartments. On this point, I believe the City Councillor could play a very active role “on the ground” within the ward by working with building managers and superintendents to ensure waste diversion promotion is being effectively implemented. Along these lines, I believe Ottawa should consider adopting (as a best practice) the Toronto Mayor’s “Towering Challenge” that promotes the 3 R’s specifically in multi-residential buildings.

Raylene Lang-Dion: YES. I agree with discussing the development of an updated evidence-based, waste management strategy to increase Ottawa’s waste diversion rates, that would encourage the adoption of best practices and create an affordable action plan that would put the city on the path towards the ideal of 65% waste diversion target.

Mike McHarg: YES. For being the nations capital, we should be a leader in waste management. I will commit to increasing our waste diversion rate to match and exceed that of other municipalities.

John Redins: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Jean Cloutier:

Clinton Cowan: Please visit clintoncowan.ca for full details (Platform to be released Sept 1).

Kevin Kit: As a community leader and candidate for Alta Vista Councillor, I believe it is incumbent to listen to the voices of residents in shaping our priorities. That is why I created the Alta Vista Survey as a first step in setting our strategic direction for Ward 18 over the next term of council. By knocking on thousands of doors – you begin to hear the collective voice of a community.  I can definitely say that through my Alta Vista Survey results and the many conversations I have had; the environment has been identified as a priority area for Alta Vista residents.

So – what specifically have I heard?

1.) We need to commit more new money for the Energy Evolution – and ensure that we have we have enough staff and resources to oversee these projects.

2.) We need to greatly improve Ottawa’s waste diversion rate.  (Ottawa’s waste diversion rate is approximately 42% – well below the the provincial average of 47%).  Residents want action on how we can improve recycling and organic collection in our City’s restaurants and apartments.

3.) We need to be able to definitively know what’s going on with our GHG emissions – as we are still using data from 2012 as well as better promoting connectivity and multi-modes of transportation across the City.

So – how can we get begin to more the yardsticks?

First, I will push hard to have a seat at the Environment and Climate Protection Committee, so I can be an active voice on getting more results in the next term of council. In this vein, we must have a City Council that is more vocal in pushing an environmental agenda.  As an auditor, I come from a professional background where results matter. Moving forward, I believe that as a City Council we all will need to challenge and push harder to ensure that we are not standing in the same spot four years from now.

Second, in Budget 2018, the City of Ottawa committed $500,000 in new money for the Energy Evolution, while investing $44M in new road expansion. This has to change. Furthermore, I believe we need to better integrate environmental considerations throughout our programming. A climate lens assessment should be applied at the planning and design stage when investing in infrastructure initiatives. I would advocate and challenge my colleagues to view proposals that come to the Council table through this lens.

Third, we need to better educate residents on what can and can’t go into their blue box and black box.  By doing so – we can begin to make real progress on bringing up our diversion rate. At the City level, many residents that I have spoken with want to improve recycling and organic collection in our City’s restaurants and apartments.  However, many have also told me that they are frustrated (in their local neighborhoods) because they see materials in blue boxes and black boxes that simply should not be there. I believe we need to do a much better job about informing Ottawa residents about specific materials for their recycling bins and I support increasing the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention and recycling.

Fourth, we need to update our data on GHG emissions and we need City Councillors who will push hard to ensure this is achieved.  We also need to take action on improving connectivity to promote cycling and pedestrian use. Specifically, in Alta Vista that would include pushing hard to ensure that we install the pedestrian bridge between the Train Yards shopping centre and the new LRT/VIA train station.  In addition, as a Community Association President in the ward, I was instrumental in ensuring that we improved connectivity when I led the negotiation of the $300 Million dollar re-development of the Elmvale Acres Mall. I am proud to report that Othello Avenue (near the Mall) will be converted into a “Complete Street” during the build-out.  Residents can be assured that I will apply this same level of energy to ensure that we promote multi-modes of transportation both across our City and in the ward of Alta Vista.

Raylene Lang-Dion: In every decision that is made during the next term of council, I commit to considering environmental implications. Sustainability and climate change mitigation strategies are clearly necessary.

Mike McHarg: All of the issues above are of great importance to me. I think plastic waste is a major issue that needs tackling and my big priority would be working with retailers and manufacturers to reduce or eliminate these single use plastics. It is imperative that we build our cities to support the healthy lives of our residents, as well as the health of our environment.

John Redins: I will not support an advertising campaign like Ottawa 2017 did giving Montrealers free gas could of given free bicycles instead

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Ward 19 – Cumberland

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Stephen Blais*:

Jensen Boire:

Cameron Rose Jette: I will make sure to follow through on all previously mentioned commitments, and will ensure that open communication with constituents, Ecology Ottawa and other environmental activists is maintained to work hard to change Ottawa for the better.

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Ward 20 – Osgoode

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I think the earth is very important to take care of but can’t commit to doing anything without reviewing the full positive and negative effects of all options.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. Response to original Q1: I believe it would also be beneficial to have ongoing consultations and input from groups such as Ecology Ottawa, Greenspace Alliance, a local branch of Park People, Blue Dot Ottawa, 350 Ottawa, and the many other environmental groups with Ottawa. Response to Updated Q1: Yes I will push for more funding and staffing however I will also be pushing for better road maintenance and improvements in the rural areas where access to public transit if very limited.

Jay Tysick:

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I cannot commit to doing anything without getting expert advice and talking with my constituents.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I believe that you have the best interests of the city and the world at heart. However, I only have one true commitment and that is to the constituents of my ward.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Auguste Banfalvi: YES. I think this is a noble goal and achievable as well, that would not only provide a greener ottawa but would be a welcome change in the right direction.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Auguste Banfalvi: YES. Im my ward(ward 20), there are very little lanes for pedestrians and little public transit reaches it. I beleive the constituents of Osgoode would welcome a better public transit system catered to them; not just one that effects downtown.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. While I clicked yes, I believe there should be an increase in funds for alternate means of transportation, the City as a whole cannot remove funding from automobile infrastructure. Our city is extremely large and there are many areas that will not benefit from public transit. We must create a balance between those dependent on cars and increasing the greenness of our city.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. This would not be benificial to my constituents. They are simply too far away to reap the rewards of this program. I cannot commit to doing something that i beleive will not positively effect my constituents, without consulting them first.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. Again, I clicked yes but not a complete yes. While an increase above 600m will be needed, the full 5km radius will not be feasible immediately. While 70% is a high number, we must remember that leaves 30% still some distance away. We must find a balance for all residents including those dependent on cars.

Jay Tysick:

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Auguste Banfalvi: YES. I think the constituents in my ward would be thrilled with this!

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. Where possible, yes I would push for complete streets. Unfortunately that is an issue in some rural areas with ditches.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Auguste Banfalvi: YES. I think that every death is a tragedy and should be learned from.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. I cannot commit to a policy that has yet to be composed for our city. I can commit to pushing to have policies and procedures created specifically for our city.

Jay Tysick:

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I would need more imformation about the Urban Forest Management plan to be able to commit to it.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. I would also insist on revisiting and revising the plan at least bi-annually due to the everchanging climate and plant species.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I think this is idealistic but l would have to look into it further to see if it is practical; therefore I cannot commit to it at this moment.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. I would also push for proper drainage and ditching in the rurals areas.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I would need to talk to my constituents and some experts on the issue before commiting.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I cannot commit to this without more information.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I don’t think that this is an issue i can commit to without looking into it further.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES. I believe we need to remove our dependence on single use plastics. I would support rescinding placing plastic bags in green bins.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I would have to ask my constituents if they would be comfortable in paying more taxes for this recylcling awareness program.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: NO. Rather than spend more funding on educating people who already have access to the green bin program, I would push to expand the program to more than just individual residences.

Jay Tysick:

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Auguste Banfalvi: NO. I would commit to this if i knew for a fact that it would have no negative consequences on my constituents.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: YES.

Jay Tysick:

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Auguste Banfalvi: I will represent my constituents as best as i can and ensure that I consult them throughout my term and going into any decision.

George Darouze*:

Mark Scharfe:

Kim Sheldrick: If elected, I will work from my environmental background and continue to consult with numerous environmental groups. There are many simple steps to be taken (eliminating plastic straws, working to replace disposable and single use plastic items with cost effective decomposable items) encouraging greening of parks and individual residences, community gardens, and planting fruit trees as opposed to trees for beauty. There are also larger steps I would push for such as local community hubs to encourage green transportation, alternate means of power, maintenance of rural drains and waterways, and greening of Sparks Street.

Jay Tysick:

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Ward 21 – Rideau-Goulbourn

Renewable City

1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: Climate action was a Term of Council Priority for this term and I don’t doubt it will be for next term. While I cannot guarantee my support for additional staffing and funding, I do believe we finally made some strides with the approval of projects under the Energy Evolution initiative accompanied with funding out of the Hydro Ottawa dividend surplus. Finding funding opportunities like that as well as supporting community organizations is a positive step.

2. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I think at this point, we’d be satisfied with once per term. Certainly, if it’s not too onerous to produce such a report once a year, I don’t see that being an issue. I do believe, however, it was an issue to increase targets without any data to indicate how we were doing against our previous targets.

3. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council? 

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I certainly won’t prevent its release.

4. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I’ll always support healthier, safer and more liveable neighbourhoods but I also believe the affordability lens needs to be applied here as well. Thankfully, I do believe we are getting to a point where low-carbon options are becoming more affordable. The advancement of the district energy system downtown is an interesting to keep an eye on when it comes to the development of Lebreton Flats.

Active City

5. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: No. It just isn’t realistic in the majority of the area that I represent. Not the answer you want but I’m not going to lie.

6. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I could certainly entertain an increase but I won’t commit without fully understanding the impact and feasibility of such a commitment. As I have shown, I do not believe in setting unachievable, yet aspirational, targets.

7. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: While all projects are put through the complete street lens, all are not possible to achieve the status of a complete street, especially in a rural cross section. However, there is a desire to accommodate additional modes in the rural area as well as in our villages and we will continue to capitalize on opportunities to do so.

8. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: Safer Roads Ottawa already adopts a “one death is too many” approach. I will continue to support the efforts of that group and we can certainly improve on road design in this city when the opportunities arise.

Living City

9. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I supported the UFMP at Committee and Council and I will continue to support it if elected.

10. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I cannot commit to this until I see the results of the pilot project. Easiest thing would be to say yes but I need to know the reality of the situation.

11. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: Yes but I also feel we do a decent job of this as it stands.

12. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: No. It would be different if we actually had a role.

Waste Management

13. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: No. It is also important to highlight that compostable plastics do not work in the Orgaworld process because of the length of time they take to break down.

14. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: Considering the number of conversations I have with residents about waste, I find it hard to imagine that education is the key impediment in achieving a higher diversion rate. As a result, I will not commit to that but I am open to that discussion during our upcoming review.

15. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*: I’ll assume you are not counting York’s contributions to the York/Durham incinerator as diversion. This term, we wrongly tied our plan to the Provincial development of their Waste Master Plan. It set us back and we need to focus on that next term. Updating our plan needs to be and will be a priority for the next Council. The more we can divert, the longer our landfill can stay open and the longer we have to find a viable alternative to burying our waste.

16. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

David Brown:

Scott Moffatt*:

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Ward 22 – Gloucester-South Nepean

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. I’m running on the platform of growth in a sustainable and respectful way. This includes respect for our green spaces, wildlife and nature trails. I also have proposed to work more with grassroots organizations such as yours to bring true democratic structure to our decision-making in the city. With my experience in environmental impact assessments, green book assessments and socio-economic impact assessments, I will bring growth with responsibility to the front of the agenda.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. I say yes in principle and promise to understand from the city why these studies are not done more frequently. If financially viable, I will propose a dashboard which residents are able to see 24/7 instead of a report that’s published periodically.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. Absolutely. I promise to work with your organization and others to pick the top 3 priorities of our residents in terms of environmental agenda. And I am promising to work collaboratively with the city and residents to ensure that the top 3 priority items feature on the priority of the city as well.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. My definition of sustainable and smart city includes an accessible city, a city that’s friendly to all modes of transportation and my ward is no exception.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. I will need to understand and study it in more detail, however in principle, I agree.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. Undoubtedly.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. I have already discussed “vision zero” from the NewYork model to be brought to Ottawa. Unless we strive for zero loss of life, a simple reduction in death numbers will not be enough. I have studied the NY model and our city could definitely implement a lot of those strategies.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. Urban forest and engagement of our residents in the plan is already my platform. I would want my ward to adopt urban forest management plan with enhanced involvement from residents.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. Absolutely.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES. This is a no brainer.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: NO. Before jumping to rescinding the decision, I would like to see evidence of it working or not working.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: NO. I wouldn’t want to commit a significant increase in budget and instead want more grassroots programs to increase our recycling rate. I believe in citizens’ engagement as much as the city being the caretaker. I believe in resudents’ Awareness sessions, workshops, finding to grassroots organizations and neighbourhood programs to achieve it, along with some low budget programs such as blue bins in city parks.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: YES.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: YES.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Zaff Ansari:

Carol Anne Meehan:

Irene Mei: Issue is a lot of meetings are held, proposals are written, meeting notes are done. But it never gets pass the bureaucracy. We spend more times in meetings and writing meeting notes then actually executing the plans effectively. I rather push for more action and less non-effective meetings that wastes time, money and energy.

Michael Qaqish*:

Harpeet Singh: 1. I propose plastic recycling bins in city parks 2. I propose a ban on plastic straws except for accessibility needs 3. I would push for more diversification of our business hubs to have more futuristic businesses in my ward so that less people have to commute to downtown and Kanata for those jobs. 4. Vision zero action plan 5. Development with responsibility and sustainability. This includes no skimping on our parks, trails, onus on developers to replenish trees and green spaces.

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Ward 23 – Kanata South

Renewable City

  1. Over the last term of council, initiatives to address climate change have been delayed, under-staffed and under-financed. It’s even unclear whether city-wide emissions have been rising or falling over the past six years. Meanwhile, some spending on city infrastructure (e.g., road expansions) is impeding or negating progress from climate investments made under the environment portfolio. At the federal level, the government has mandated a new climate lens assessment for its infrastructure funding program, Investing in Canada.

If elected, will you make climate action a Term of Council Priority, increase funding and staffing commitments commensurate with this prioritization, and mandate a climate lens for the City’s assessment for all infrastructure investments?

Steve Anderson: YES. I do not yet know all the aspects of the Phase 1 plan. But in general, I support environmental issues and the need for green.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I will need to research these requests more in order to understand the impact on the City as a whole.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. I support all initiatives, at any level of government, that addresses impact on our environment.

  1. The City of Ottawa reports on community-wide climate emissions once every four years through the Air Quality and Climate Change Management Plan. This infrequent reporting makes tracking progress toward our climate goals very difficult, and is far behind the standard set by leading cities such as Edmonton and Montreal.

If elected, will you commit to increasing the frequency of the City’s community-wide emissions reporting to at least once per year?

Steve Anderson: YES. Anything less than once a year seems unacceptable.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I will need to research these requests more in order to understand the impact on the City as a whole.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. I support all initiatives that measure and quantify our impact on our climate.

  1. Climate change is accelerating, and cities around the world are rushing to adapt to the impacts of severe weather, flooding and invasive species. The City of Ottawa has committed to developing a Climate Adaptation Plan but hasn’t yet delivered.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring the release and initial implementation of a Climate Adaptation Plan within the next term of council?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would have to review how much of the plan is completed in order to give a firm deadline.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. I support all initiatives that achieve quantifiable and measurable improvement to slow or reverse human initiated climate change.

  1. Development of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will begin in January 2019 and conclude during the next term of council. The Official Plan sets the ground rules that can make it easier or virtually impossible for cities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions—from transportation patterns and sprawl, to housing densities and unit sizes, to options for local renewable energy production, to the services, amenities, and greenspaces residents can access within walking distance. Official Plans developed with climate change in mind deliver powerful benefits that make neighbourhoods healthier, safer, and more liveable.

If elected, will you support and work for a revised Official Plan that makes low-carbon development a top priority, in a way that delivers healthier, safer, more liveable neighbourhoods for your constituents?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would review all lenses of how the Official plan is developed and then make a decision.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. The very platform I stand on is based on respecting and preserving our natural environment, particularly within the Greater Ottawa Region.

Active City

  1. Evidence from numerous studies of “induced demand” shows that widening highways and building new roads does nothing to alleviate traffic congestion. Instead, new roads and new lanes are quickly filled up with cars. Congestion is only relieved through investment in alternative forms of travel – by bike, by foot and by public transit.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I will review where the congestion areas are in my ward and review all methods to determine the best solutions for the residents of Kanata South

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. I am committed to achieve these goals within reasonable parameters. We live in the coldest climate of any Capital City, and such measures need to be implemented within the limitations of climate, seasons, actual user traffic, and within established budgets. For the record, I am a cyclist and walk frequently in our city. We also must be realistic. Personal travel (automobiles) is not optional for many commuters. I have had many positions in my career where car travel was mandatory. The larger issue is helping people live where they work.

  1. Upon completion, the City of Ottawa’s light rail transit (LRT) network will bring 70% of the population to within five kilometres of a light rail station. It will be easier than ever for Ottawans to travel to and from their target destinations using sustainable transportation options, but only if the City prioritizes shared mobility services and pedestrian, cycling and transit connectivity near transit hubs.

Currently, the City of Ottawa only plans for connectivity within 600 metres of transit hubs. If elected, will you commit to widening this connectivity planning radius to five kilometres?

Steve Anderson: YES. Yes! And autonomous vehicles to the hubs.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review this request and understand all factors before making a final decision

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: NO. I need further data to comment.

  1. The City of Ottawa adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and an implementation plan in 2015. Now, all new roads must be built to be accessible to all ages, users and abilities – including pedestrians, cyclists and transit users – rather than just car drivers. However, evidence shows that the policy alone is not sufficient to create complete streets. Councillor leadership is vital to ensure streets are as “complete” as possible and follow through on priority pedestrian and cycling projects identified in the Transportation Master Plan.

If elected, will you commit to ensuring that complete streets and priority pedestrian and cycling projects are built in your ward?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review this policy to make a final decision

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: NO. Let’s be realistic. Not all roads can be made ‘complete’ under the definition. What is needed is a practical, achievable objective. For example, as a cyclist experienced riding in heavy traffic, I go out of my way to find a safe route. A better use of resources is to improve existing routes. I have artificial knees. Many of the sidewalks in Bridlewood are too inclined to walk in a straight line! First, we have to improve existing infrastructure. Secondly, we plan for the future.

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, 148 people died on Ottawa’s streets. These deaths were entirely avoidable – they were a by-product of the way we have designed our streets. Toronto and Edmonton have embraced a “Vision Zero” approach to road design, that considers all traffic deaths and serious injuries preventable. A Vision Zero policy involves design changes (i.e. reducing speeds and separating road users), funding for these changes and public reporting on progress.

If elected, will you commit to adopting a Vision Zero policy for Ottawa?

Steve Anderson: YES. I do not know all the details of “Vision Zero”, but I agree with the overview given here.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review and understand this policy further in order to make a final decision

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: NO. Vision Zero, by definition, is an initiative developed in Sweden to reduce highway fatalities. Let’s be practical. Again, as a cyclist who has been “run down” three times, I believe it is impossible to prevent careless acts by negligent people; cyclists and drivers alike. I would support practical initiatives that ensure all traffic obey the law. I have several ideas how we can improve a ‘shared road’ experience.

Living City

  1. In 2017, the City of Ottawa adopted a strong Urban Forest Management Plan designed to safeguard and strengthen Ottawa’s tree canopy. The plan contains a 20-year action plan that requires sustained attention and investment.

If elected, will you commit to fully implementing and fully funding the Urban Forest Management Plan?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: YES.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: NO. After reading nearly 60 pages of the UFMP, and not reading a single word about anyone actually planting a tree, I began to fall asleep. We can do better, and not in the next 20 years. We can do better, now.

  1. Flooding and severe weather events are happening in Ottawa more frequently than in the past. It’s more important than ever that the City adapt to climate change by systematically scaling up development of green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up, and filter rainwater, such as trees, rain gardens and permeable pavements. The City has the policy tools to do this, but remains at the pilot phase and has not moved to wide-scale implementation.

If elected, will you work to ensure that all street resurfacing and new road construction integrate green infrastructure wherever possible?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review the City’s policy in order to make a final decision.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. South Kanata sits on a vital watershed, and our precious natural resources are becoming nothing more than drainage for storm water. Everything from Kanata South flows through Kanata North, into the Ottawa River, and back out our taps. What affects Kanata affects the whole region. We must replant natural vegetation now along the Carp River.

  1. Urban greenspace is a precious commodity. Yet sprawling development patterns, infill developments, and road widenings regularly threaten our trees, greenspace and biodiversity.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing greenspace preservation as part of the planning process?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review the current greenspace preservation process in order to make a final decision.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES.

  1. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories is proposing a permanent radioactive waste facility alongside the Ottawa River, upstream from Ottawa. Mayors of over 100 Quebec municipalities have banded together to oppose this proposal, citing a serious risk to drinking water from the Ottawa River.

If elected, will you join them in opposing this dangerous nuclear waste dump?

Steve Anderson: YES. I don’t know all the details about this, but building such a facility alongside the Ottawa River seems strange.

Mike Brown: NO. I would to review the proposal to better understand the request in order to make a final decision

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES.

Waste Management

  1. In March 2018, City Council changed its contract with Orgaworld to allow dog waste and other organics to be placed in green bins using non-compostable plastic bag liners. There’s no evidence that allowing plastics will encourage more people to compost. But the new rules will produce a new stream of unnecessary plastic waste that will complicate the disposal process and deliver lower-quality compost.

If elected, will you support rescinding the decision to allow non-compostable plastic bag liners and dog waste in the green bin program?

Steve Anderson: YES.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would need to review more data from Orgaworld after the one year mark in order to pass judgement.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. As a former dog owner who always picked up after his pet, and flushed the waste into the sewer system, it disgusts me how most pet waste is disposed of. I have other ideas to help with this issue.

  1. Ottawa’s 44% waste recycling rate is the lowest of all major cities in Ontario, well below leading municipalities like York Region at 65%, Halton Region at 56%, and Toronto at 51%. That’s partly because Ottawa only spends 50¢ per household per year to promote the program and educate residents.

If elected, will you support tripling the level of funding for promotion and education for waste prevention, recycling, and green bin programs to at least $1.50 per household per year, a level closer to the average for large municipalities in Ontario?

Steve Anderson: YES. Not as sure about this one. I’m not confident that more money for education will have the desired result. But I like the spirit of this.

Mike Brown: NO. If elected, I would review the current promotions in order to provide a final answer.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: NO. I suggest we explore the issue. Why don’t more people participate? If we are to invest resources, let’s find out ‘why’.

  1. Ottawa’s 2011 waste management plan is out of date and irrelevant. The City has made no effort to update the plan, though the poor performance of its recycling and green bin programs falls far short of the 65% waste diversion rate in York Region, the leading municipality in the province.

If elected, will you support the development of a new waste management strategy and waste diversion action plan that follow best practices and set a 65% waste diversion target for Ottawa?

Steve Anderson: YES. Sounds good.

Mike Brown: YES. If elected, I would review this policy, if we can create more efficiency in our collection methods, then that is best for the City.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: YES. “Yes”, but only after we find out ‘why’ people are not participating.

  1. If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

Steve Anderson: Not sure if there is enough space to write it all here, but will try…. My first priority if elected is to immediately obtain funding for the LRT to at least Terry Fox in Kanata. There is no excuse for further delays and political games. No more of some local politicians saying that they want LRT while they work behind the scenes to talk it down and build roads. Tied to this is the need to improve the bus service in Kanata South – I have taken the bus to work for 16 years now and I have seen enough to know that vast improvements are needed to get people out of their cars and efficiently moved around. I “get” public transit, and I support the transit workers. My second biggest priority is to fix up Kanata South – one bench, sidewalk, garbage can, bus stop at a time. Things are falling apart! City workers and volunteers working together can fix things – we need fewer contractors who leave torn-up grass, pylons in ditches and random piles of dirt that just sit for years. We desperately need to make our neighbourhoods more walkable, bikeable and liveable. Parks that are interesting and that people want to visit for more than a kids’ soccer game and a row of lawnchairs. If things look tidy and nice, pride will return to our communities. I also agree with the need to improve the condition of many of our roads – but why not add more cycling lanes and proper sidewalks as it is done (no more cycling “death traps” like Eagleson Road). More flower and shrub gardens on corners. Corporate sponsors are more than willing to help, and volunteers are ready to maintain them, but “the system” keeps putting roadblocks up. Strengthen our community associations and promote the democratic will of our residents to do more than just plan social events and rely on the whim of a councillor to make improvements happen. There is so much work to do, and it is past time to get started! Thank you!

Mike Brown: I would need to review the current strategy in order to revise and see where we need revisions. Thank you for the questions, If elected, I look forward to providing more defined responses.

Allan Hubley*:

Doug Large: Quite simply, I will consult with our senior public officials involved in all areas of environmental concern, ask them for improvements and suggestions, and implement them. The people already in position to know the answers need to feel they will be heard.

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Mayoral Debate on Environmental Issues

Register here to attend the Mayoral All-Candidates’ Debate on the Environment!

In the lead up to the 2018 Ottawa municipal election, Ecology Ottawa is hosting an All-Candidates’ Mayoral Debate on the Environment. The debate, co-hosted by Ottawa Riverkeeper, Walk Ottawa, Healthy Transportation Coalition, Waste Watch Ottawa, Just Food, and the Greenspace Alliance of Canada’s Capital, will take place at the Shaw Centre on Wednesday, September 26th.

The two hour debate, to which all mayoral candidates have been invited, will include questions on climate change adaptation, waste management, environmental justice, active transportation and greenspace, among other municipally-focused environmental concerns.

The event will have limited seating, and pre-registration is especially encouraged. To register for the event, click here. 

WHAT: Mayoral All-Candidates’ Debate on the Environment

WHEN: September 26th, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Shaw Centre Room 215 (55 Colonel By Drive)

Here at Ecology Ottawa, we prioritize municipal politics and action on environmental issues, because this is where we see meaningful moves being made. As a member-driven organization we rely on generous donations from supporters like you. Consider making a donation to support our municipal elections campaign, and events like the Mayoral All-Candidates’ Debate on the Environment when you register. Thank you for all you do to help make Ottawa the Greenest Capital in the world.

R.S.V.P TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT

Tweet the Candidates to let them know you’re attending the debate, and think they should, too!

 

ACTION ALERT: Let’s Green Ottawa City Council!

We need your help getting our all-candidates’ survey into the hands of each and every Ottawa municipal candidate. 

The citizens of Ottawa will vote for mayor and council on Monday, October 22. Here at Ecology Ottawa, one of our top priorities between now and election day is to ensure that environmental concerns are a priority election issue.

To do this, we’ve developed a sixteen-question survey for candidates to complete, touching on a wide array of Ottawa-specific environmental concerns. These questions encompass four different areas: climate change action (Renewable City), building safe and healthy streets (Active City), protecting Ottawa’s greenspace and watersheds (Living City) and waste management. These questions focus candidates’ attention on the most pressing environmental issues affecting Ottawa. The answers let environmentally-minded voters know where politicians stand, and allow us to hold elected representatives to account on campaign promises.

Where do you come in? Although we’ve sent out this survey to all nominees, and have made efforts to speak with everyone, the call to action means so much more when it comes from you – the constituents.

We’re asking you to reach out to candidates by phone, email, and social media, urging them to complete our survey by the end of the day on August 10th if they have not already done so. You can see which candidates have already completed our survey by clicking here. We have prepared an email template and sample tweets below, and you can find your candidate contact information here.

Remember to CC us on all emails to your candidates (info@ecologyottawa.ca) and tag us in tweets (@ecologyottawa) so we can keep track of all of the amazing work you’re doing.

With your help and dedication, we’ll be able to make environmental issues a top priority this election cycle.

Robb, Dana, Vi, Velta, and the Ecology Ottawa team

 

Sample Email:

Hello [YOUR CANDIDATE’S NAME]

I am writing to you today as a citizen of Ottawa, voting member of Ottawa, and someone who cares about the well-being of our natural environment. As part of a community effort to ensure environmental issues are addressed in the 2018 municipal election, local non-profit Ecology Ottawa has developed a survey to better understand candidates’ positions on environmental issues.

If you have yet to complete the survey (https://goo.gl/forms/6P1KRAnmzv3WN9Vv2), I implore you to do so by August 10th.  Whether it is addressing the local effects of climate change and climate adaptation, ensuring our streets are outfitted with adequate pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, or supporting the health of our urban forests, municipal level action on environmental issues is of the utmost importance.

Take the time today to fill out this quick survey to let us, your constituents, know where you stand on environmental issues.

Thank you, 

[YOUR NAME HERE]

Sample Tweet: 

Hi [@YOURCANDIDATE] have you filled out the survey on environmental issues in Ottawa from @EcologyOttawa? Tell us where you stand on active transportation, green infrastructure, and climate change. #ottvote #ottvoteeco #ecoott

 

 

 

Victory on Holland Ave!

Thanks to the actions of grassroots activists and supporters like you, Holland Ave. will be getting a safer detour for cyclists installed this summer.

The last few weeks have seen renewed debate surrounding cycling and pedestrian infrastructure in Ottawa. When Mayor Jim Watson announced earlier this year that plans to build bi-directional bike paths had been scrapped in favour of preserving parking along Holland Ave., the cycling community in Ottawa sprung into action.

The detour, which up until now had been limited to poorly designed “sharrows” and instructions to ride on the sidewalk, was put in place for the duration of the two-year Harmer Avenue Bridge reconstruction. Though Mayor Watson had conceded initially that the detour would be revisited in the summer of 2019, it was clear from the start that community members weren’t going to be satisfied with unclear and unsafe bike infrastructure.

The opposition came to a head last Friday when over 100 cyclists gathered on Holland Ave. to stage a “critical mass” style bike ride, where activists and organizers took to the streets with their bicycles, following the detour sharrows, and in doing so, restricted traffic during rush hour.

In response to the critical mass protest, mounting bad press, and a deluge of incoming emails from supporters like you, Mayor Watson announced on Thursday, July 26th that in the coming weeks Hintonburg community members should expect a renewed detour, complete with segregated bike lanes on either side of the road, and identified by paint and flexi-posts.

Congratulations to all those who worked so hard to hold our municipal leaders accountable for pedestrian and cyclist safety. Thanks also to the City of Ottawa and to the political leaders who responded to community concerns.

Consider donating today to support Ecology Ottawa’s work on local sustainable transportation initiatives like this one. Thank you for all you do to help make Ottawa a greener city.  
Donate now

Green Infrastructure in Ottawa: A State of the City Report

Button_French version

 

 

Green infrastructure – the use of natural and built systems to slow down, soak up and filter stormwater – is an exciting area of focus for many cities around the world; Green infrastructure can be used to manage wet weather impacts in a way that enhances water quality and strengthens resilience to impacts from climate change. Ottawa has started experimenting with green infrastructure with a number of pilot programs, and has begun collecting data.

Ecology Ottawa issues this state-of-the-city report on green infrastructure in Ottawa to highlight the lessons Ottawa can learn from other jurisdictions regarding next steps on green infrastructure, discuss the policy conversation within the context of existing plans and local actors and concludes with a list of recommendations for the city to develop green infrastructure policy and climate resilience. Some policy recommendations include:

  • Move beyond green infrastructure experimentation to widespread implementation, using targets and timelines to track robust implementation.
  • Develop a green roofs bylaw, following the example set by the City of Toronto.
  • Implement green streets at scale, using a “green standard” for street design and adequate funding for widespread implementation.
  • Develop and preserve Ottawa’s urban forest using hard targets for reducing effective impervious areas and for enhancing urban forest canopy cover.
  • Implement low-impact development requirements for new developments and re-developments. As part of this, the City could use runoff volume control targets to manage at least the first 25 millimetres of water on site.
  • Promote on-site green infrastructure measures for homeowners through the use of a public engagement and awareness campaigns, like the one currently being piloted in the Pinecrest area.

Download an electronic copy of the report here: Green Infrastructure Report.PDF

Active Transportation Survey Summary

In addition to Ecology Ottawa’s active transportation report, which can be downloaded here, Ecology Ottawa sent out a survey to Ottawa community associations, business improvement areas (BIAs) and community health centres to explore how Ottawa could increase the proportion of people that use active transportation to reach their regular travel destinations. We looked at opportunities, challenges and solutions.

18 07 13 - Survey pic]

Of the 156 community associations, 19 BIAs and 16 community health and resource centers across Ottawa that we contacted in early 2018, we received responses from 35 community associations across urban, suburban and rural Ottawa, 11 BIAs and 7 community health centers. Some of the findings of this survey include:

  1. Active transportation is a key issue among urban and suburban communities, but less so in rural areas. The lack of engagement among rural communities is due to a lack of interest among residents, or lack of motivation/time to do so.
  2. Most communities don’t find that their streets have become safer for pedestrians and cyclists over the past few years. Urban communities prioritize improved conditions and maintenance of streets and sidewalks, more segregated bike lanes, and more sidewalks. Suburban communities prioritize more multi-use pathways, bike sharing networks, and better signage. Rural communities think we should prioritize improved conditions and maintenance of streets and sidewalks.
  3. Safety remains the largest barrier preventing people to cycle, along with inadequate or poorly maintained infrastructure. Trends are consistent across communities.
  4. The main barriers preventing residents from walking are inclement weather and icy sidewalks in urban communities, and poor connectivity and service in suburban and rural communities. All groups think poorly maintained infrastructure contributes to the problem.
  5. All groups recognize the benefits of active transportation in improving fitness and, to a lesser degree, reducing social isolation and increasing mobility and safety for children.

Download an electronic copy of our summary document here: Active Transportation Survey 2018 Summary. We would like to thank our research team for their time and support of this survey.

Please consider making a donation to help us continue this important work.

How to get involved and help elect a greener city council

Monday, October 22nd is the date of the municipal elections for Ottawa.  That means we have the opportunity to elect a city council and mayor who prioritize a green, healthy and liveable Ottawa for the next four years.

Ecology Ottawa sees the upcoming election as an important opportunity to elect a greener city council. We want city councillors who value sustainable modes of transportation like walking, cycling and transit, who seek to preserve and enhance Ottawa’s trees, greenspaces and waterways, and who are committed to strong action on climate change. We can only achieve this vision if hundreds of people across the city come together to take action.

Passionate about the environment and want to help out? Here are different ways you can get involved.

Pyramid

1. Door-to-door outreach canvass

2. Organize a flyer drop

3. Phone bank to recruit volunteers

4. Organize an all-candidates’ debate on the environment in your ward

5. Ask your candidates to respond to our all-candidates’ survey

6. Attend a debate in your ward and ask your candidates about their environmental priorities

7. Ask candidates about their environmental priorities when they come to your door

1. Door-to-door outreach canvass

The most important action you can take in the election is to conduct direct outreach – to help us speak to the thousands of voters who want environmental leadership but need to know more in order to place their vote. This is the most effective way to communicate directly with the voters who will determine the future composition of council. It’s a chance to find out what environmental issues matter to voters, to enlist their support for a greener city council, and to get their contact information in order to share events, candidate survey results and other information at critical moments.

Getting involved in our door campaign is easy: just join the team of Ecology Ottawa volunteers going out to canvasses several times a week. Contact our organizer Dana to sign up.

Door-to-door canvassing is more fun when you’re joined by dozens of other people. With that in mind, Ecology Ottawa is organizing three mass canvass days in priority areas of the city – two “Storm the Ward” events over the summer and one “Get Out the Vote” event towards election day. These are opportunities for new volunteers to get involved, and for a massive amount of people to knock on thousands of doors in a few hours. Best of all, they’re a lot of fun.

The two Storm the Ward days are scheduled for July 29 and August 26 at 3:30 pm. You can contact Dana (dana.taylor@ecologyottawa.ca) to sign up and find out about Get Out the Vote days.

2. Organize a flyer drop

We expect all responses to our survey to be in by mid-August, with findings for public consumption by late August / early September. This also happens to be the time that voters start paying closer attention to the election. The flyer drop will consist of delivering ward-level summaries of candidates’ responses to our environmental survey to voters in your ward. 

If you would like to organize in your ward, we’re here to help. Contact Dana Taylor (dana.taylor@ecologyottawa.ca) to let her know you would like to conduct a flyer drop in your ward. Ecology Ottawa will help by preparing and printing materials, and by connecting you with other volunteers in your area.

3. Phone bank to recruit volunteers

We need volunteers! We’re phoning up the hundreds of people who express an interest in volunteering at Ecology Ottawa and are looking for ways to get involved. We’re organizing phone banks on a regular basis to drum up support for our campaign and to grow our network of community organizers. Join us by emailing Dana Taylor at dana.taylor@ecologyottawa.ca.

4. Organize an all-candidates’ debate on the environment in your ward

All-candidates’ debates are a great way to hear directly from candidates about their positions and platforms. By airing key questions in a public forum, we also get a chance to alert engaged citizens and community leaders as well.

Organizing an all-candidates’ debate in your ward can be easy, especially if you start planning early and involve other groups and community associations. If you are interested in organizing a debate, we would be happy to lend a hand. Email vi.bui@ecologyottawa to get started.

5. Ask your candidates to respond to our all-candidates’ survey

Ecology Ottawa has issued an all-candidates’ survey to every candidate for mayor and council in this election. The goal is to find out where candidates stand on key environmental issues. This is important as a way to connect with and educate council candidates on the key environmental initiatives at play in the city, but this effort requires more than a few emails and phone calls to candidates. One key challenge will be to get candidates to respond to our survey. To do this, we need volunteers to ask candidates to respond to the survey. Plus, it is a lot more impactful when candidates hear from residents in their ward.

You can find out the candidates in your ward and check out who has responded to our survey by visiting ecoott.ca/surveyresults.

You can download the all-candidates’ survey, as well as see the list of local candidates and their contact information, by visiting ecoott.ca/survey.

We encourage you to email or call your local candidates to talk about the Ecology Ottawa’s all-candidates’ survey. Even better, arrange a meeting or host a meet-and greet to get to know your candidates and talk to them about key environmental issues in your ward. Reach out to us at vi.bui@ecologyottawa.ca if you need help hosting or preparing for a meeting.

6. Attend a debate in your ward and ask your candidates about their environmental priorities

If organizing a debate isn’t your cup of tea, you can also attend one. An all-candidates-debate is an opportunity for candidates to directly hear from their constituents. That’s you! Using Ecology Ottawa’s all-candidates’ survey as a guide, you can attend the debates hosted in your ward and ask your candidates questions about their environmental priorities and their plan to address environmental issues specific to your ward.

7. Ask candidates about their environmental priorities when they come to your door

Many candidates are already out there knocking on doors in their ward to talk to their voters. Some might have already knocked on your door. One way to bring environmental issues forward is to let them know you care. Tell them about local issues your ward is facing, as well as city-wide issues outlined in Ecology Ottawa’s all-candidates’ survey.

Have ideas about how else you can help? Let us know! 

 

On climate policy, Ontario will leave Doug Ford behind

Below is a blog post from Avery Dawes, one of the members of Ecology Ottawa’s summer team.

On July 3, Premier Doug Ford officially ended Ontario’s cap-and-trade program and removed his government from the national debate on climate and emissions reduction policy. According to Ford, the program would cost Ontarians too much money while doing “nothing for the environment.” Like Jason Kenney in Alberta and Premier Scott Moe in Saskatchewan, Ford is a longtime vocal opponent of provincial and federal efforts to fight climate change and protect the environment.

Ford claims that “Help is here,” but he will be hurting plenty of people in Ontario by abandoning his and everyone’s responsibility to help fight climate change, reneging on the businesses that bought nearly $3 billion in permits with no guarantee of refund, and ignoring people in high density social housing where upgrades were planned and are widely needed.

Saving money may help some, but Doug Ford can’t even guarantee savings. He can’t guarantee anything on climate strategy if he refuses to act. The federal government has the ability to implement a carbon tax and to punish Ontario for not doing its part in the fight against climate change. Recently, the federal government announced it was reviewing $420 million dollars in transfer payments to Ontario in response to the end of the cap-and-trade program. Ontario loses control of its strategy to fight climate change if the federal government steps in with a carbon tax. Ontarians who save money at the gas pump or on heating as a result of the cancellation will likely see the expense rise again soon under the federal program.

In the face of strong opposition, Premier Rachel Notley kept control of climate strategy in Alberta and implemented a carbon tax by and for Alberta. Whether each Albertan agrees with the program or not, it is under their collective control. In Ontario, Ford has chosen to hand that power to the federal government. Instead of a cap-and-trade market, the federal carbon tax backstop will likely be implemented. It would be a direct carbon tax, the first in Ontario. Instead of being a relative leader on this file, Ontario will be dragged behind and forced to follow the Trudeau government’s strategy. For better or worse, if there is enough political will at the federal level, Doug Ford is largely irrelevant to climate strategy in Canada.

Everyone must do their part as Canada works to reduce its emissions and curb the damaging effects of climate change. While Ford is premier, Ontarians must focus on working with the federal government to implement a strong plan that fits the unique needs of the province. Securing a meaningful strategy to fight climate change through the federal government will be hard. The current backstop pricing does not go far enough in reducing emissions and a mere carbon tax without details on how the money will be spent in Ontario does little to inspire change beyond just charging more for emissions intensive products or services. The Trudeau government is formulating its plan for Ontario’s emissions reduction strategy and it is imperative that Ontarians are a part of that discussion.

Ford and some other politicians across Canada routinely dismiss efforts to reduce emissions as too costly and having no real effect on climate change. The economic argument works short term, but climate change is an expensive problem to deal with. For example, wildfires brought on and exacerbated by climate change cost the US government $1.7 billion in 2013 and up to $62.5 billion by 2050. In a recent study, the United Nations found that the cost of adapting to climate change could reach $500 billion per year by 2050. The money saved by scrapping the cap-and-trade program pales in comparison to the money we can save by taking action.

It is unlikely that we will find an effective dollar-bin strategy to fight one of the biggest issues facing the planet, but we can have a real impact on climate change. By contacting their elected officials and by organizing in communities, Ontarians can have their voices heard and advocate for a climate strategy in Ontario that takes meaningful action to reduce emissions to safe levels. If Doug Ford has a cheaper strategy to achieve the result he says is not being met, he should speak up now. Otherwise, he can take his ball and go home while Ontarians work for a sustainable and prosperous future.

For more information on how you can get involved and help fight climate change locally, visit EcologyOttawa.ca/TakeAction.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Cap-and-trade withdrawal threatens to derail municipal climate progress across Ontario

July 10, 2018

(Hamilton, Oakville, Ottawa, Toronto and Windsor) – The Urban Climate Alliance – a coalition of five city-level Ontario environmental organizations – has researched the potential impact of provincial withdrawal from cap-and-trade and found that cities are facing a massive funding gap. Hundreds of millions of dollars of cap-and-trade revenues have already been directed to projects in Hamilton, Oakville, Ottawa, Toronto and Windsor that will help fight climate change, with even more money anticipated for planned projects. In Ottawa alone, over $50 million was allocated to or anticipated for local projects. The province’s withdrawal from the cap-and-trade program, with no clear alternative funding stream identified, threatens to derail municipal climate progress across Ontario.

“Money from the cap-and-trade program was helping Ontario cities fight climate change, but it was also making them more livable,” said Robb Barnes, Executive Director of Ecology Ottawa. “Money in Ottawa was going towards key pieces of cycling and pedestrian infrastructure like the new pedestrian footbridge over the Rideau Canal, as well as more walkable and bike-friendly streets near light rail stations along the Albert-Slater corridor. It was also helping make social housing more energy efficient and affordable for low income residents.”

The province’s cap-and-trade withdrawal leaves Ontario cities in a difficult position. With such a large funding gap, cities would struggle to continue ambitious climate program commitments using their limited tax base. The Urban Climate Alliance researched where funding from carbon pricing has gone so far in Hamilton, Oakville, Ottawa, Toronto and Windsor. Already, money has been directed to a wide range of climate programs, including:

  • The development of community energy plans;
  • Upgrading energy efficiency in municipal buildings;
  • Retrofitting social housing to modernize the building stock while reducing greenhouse gas pollution;
  • Purchasing electric buses and low-emissions vehicles;
  • Building more pedestrian- and cycling-friendly streets; and
  • Scaling up the use of renewable energy.

“In Ottawa, buildings and transportation make up nearly 90% of all emissions city-wide,” said Robb Barnes. “Through investments in social housing and active transportation, cap-and-trade money was going to where it was most needed in Ottawa. So far, the new provincial government has demonstrated no clear plan for climate action, leaving cities in the lurch.”

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For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact:

Robb Barnes
Executive Director
Ecology Ottawa
robb.barnes@ecologyottawa.ca
613-860-5353 (office), 613-276-5753 (cell)

About: 

The Urban Climate Alliance is a collective of urban-based environmental groups made up of  Ecology Ottawa, Toronto Environmental Alliance, Environment Hamilton, Oakvillegreen Conservation Association and Citizens Environment Alliance (Windsor).

Green Infrastructure Workshops

The future of cities is green.

Around the world, cities are designing and building green infrastructure – living and built systems designed to slow down, soak up and filter rain water where it lands – into their urban fabric. Green infrastructure is seen as a great way to keep waterways clean, fight flooding and adapt to climate impacts while greening the urban environment. Cities are experimenting with green roofs, rain gardens, bioswales and the widespread adoption of tools like rain barrels and permeable pavement.

You can learn more about green infrastructure and how it can transform your community by joining us at two workshops. RSVP to our Blackburn Hamlet or Pinecrest-area events today!

 

Ottawa has begun experimenting with green infrastructure, but has a lot to learn from other cities that are implementing innovative green solutions at scale.

Let’s get the ball rolling! Our two green infrastructure workshops will engage Ottawans on this exciting topic. We will be discussing findings from a new Ecology Ottawa report on the state of green infrastructure in Ottawa, including a look at best practices from other cities. We will also help participants identify the tangible steps they can take to implement green infrastructure solutions at the household and neighbourhood level.

Join us by RSVPing today. Our two workshops are being held in two communities at the forefront of the City of Ottawa’s green infrastructure efforts, with one event in Blackburn Hamlet (July 24) and one event in the Pinecrest area (July 25). Both events start at 6:30 pm.

Don’t forget to spread the word on Facebook:

Workshop #1 (July 24th)

Workshop #2 (July 25th)