Our Successes

Founded in 2007 in a living room in Ottawa, Ecology Ottawa has since grown into a city-wide movement. We work with Ottawa residents, organizations and businesses to advocate for more vibrant green space, healthier watersheds, safer streets and stronger action on climate change. Below are some of our past successes and initiatives.

Tree Ottawa (2013-present)

In response to Emerald Ash Borer, we launched the Tree Ottawa initiative to raise awareness of the need for a healthy city-wide urban canopy and promote action to counter threats to this canopy.  Some of the successes include the 11,000 petition signatures among Ottawa residents demanding the City of Ottawa to develop a strong Urban Forest Management Plan, 9 communities and 7 schools engaged in tree planting and greening projects, 750,000 trees planted and 11,000 saplings distributed across Ottawa towards the Million-Tree Initiative, etc.

TarFree613 – Stopping the Energy East Pipeline (2013-2017)

Ecology Ottawa mobilized nearly 10,000 Ottawa residents and demonstrated the broad-based public opposition to the proposed Energy East Pipeline. We’ve collected 8,800 signatures on a petition opposing the pipeline, distributed 200,000 loonie stickers and lawn signs across Ottawa and beyond, built partnerships among national and regional organizations, organized film screenings, panels, demonstrations and rallies, and intervened the review process through the National Energy Board. On October 5, 2017, TransCanada announced it abandoned the project.

Streetfight: Janette Sadik-Khan’s Urban Revolution Come to Ottawa (2016)

On April 28, 2016, Ecology Ottawa hosted the New York City’s Transportation Commissioner, Janette Sadik-Khan, in what became the largest event in Ecology Ottawa’s history. Ms Sadik-Khan talked about how she re-imagined public spaces and helped transform the streets New York – one of the world’s greatest, toughest cities – into dynamic spaces for pedestrians and cyclists. At the event, Ecology Ottawa also launched our Street Restoration Map, outlining streets in Ottawa up for redesign until 2019.

100% Possible March (2015)

In the lead up to the federal election in 2015, Ecology Ottawa and its partners organized 100% Possible: Marching for Climate Solutions and Justice on Parliament Hill. With 25,000 participants, it was the largest climate mobilization in the history of Ottawa.

Complete Streets Campaign (2013-2015)

Ecology Ottawa called on the City of Ottawa to adopt the Complete Streets policy through citizen mobiliziation. The City adopted the Complete Streets policy in 2013, and came out with an implementation framework in 2015. We continue to mobilize residents in neighbourhoods where streets are up for redevelopment and demanded a wide-scale implementation of the policy.

Ottawa River Action Plan (2012-2014)

Addressing the dumping of untreated sewage in the Ottawa River, Ecology Ottawa started a petition to stop the dumping of untreated sewage. We knocked on thousands of doors, collected over 12,000 signatures, and ultimately successfully demanded Province of Ontario and the Federal Government to help the City of Ottawa fund their Ottawa River Action Plan.

Community Network (2011-2012)

The campaign developed local leadership willing to come together to take neighbourhood-based action to improve the environment. By the end of the campaign, we established 15 Community Network Teams across the city, and mobilized these teams around our campaigns and election-related outreach.

No Energy to Waste Pilot Project (2010)

The campaign engaged local service services agencies in reducing energy consumption in their buildings. Partnered with Energy Ottawa, ICF Marbek and Kaladar Enersave Management delivered $11,000 worth of free energy audits to Causeway Work Centre, Ottawa Mission and Shepherds of Good Hope.

Green Buildings and Workplaces Challenge (2009-2010)

Aimed to promote environmentally sustainable and energy efficient practices in buildings, Ecology Ottawa engaged 28 participating Green Teams from the following sectors: unions, federal government departments, NGOs, community health and community resource centres, businesses, service providers, media, housing co-operative.